New Improvements of Planting and Gardening, Both Philosophical and Practical: In Three Parts. Containing, A new system of vegetation .... The best manner of improving flower gardens or parterres .... Of improving fruit-trees, kitchen-gardens, and green-house plants ... To which is added, that scarce and valuable tract, intitled, Herefordshire-orchards .... I.. II.. III.

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A. Bettesworth & C. Hitch, 1739 - Agriculture - 608 pages
 

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Page 229 - Infeft then is nourifhed by the Juices of the Tree, and grows together with the Leaves, till all its Body is perfected ; and at the Fall of the Leaf, drops from the Tree with the Leaves growing to its Body like Wings, and then walks about...
Page 61 - ... glasses as before, you will have the figure desired. " So likewise a pentagon may be perfectly represented, by finding the fifth part of a circle, and placing the glasses upon the outlines of it ; and the fourth part of a circle will likewise produce a square, by means of the glasses, or, by the same rule, will give us any figure of equal sides. I easily suppose that a curious person, by a little practice with these glasses, may make many improvements with them, which, perhaps, I may not have...
Page 16 - By this knowledge we may alter the property and taste of any Fruit by impregnating the one with the Farina of another of the same class ; as, for example, a Codlin with a Pearmain, which will occasion the Codlin so impregnated to last a longer time than usual, and be of a sharper taste ; or if the Winter Fruits...
Page 255 - They may thus remain rill their firft Leaf is about the Bignefs of a Crown-Piece ; and then when the fecond or third Joint appears, cut off the Prime Leader from each Plant, near the Ear-Leaves or Lobes, and they will each of them quickly put out three other Runners, which will produce Fruit plentifully ; and thofe alfo are commonly pruned at every third or fourth Joint, S 4 when when they come to run : This is the common way. About the latter End of April, or the firft Week in May, the Melon Plants...
Page 12 - female parts are remote from each other ; as, " for example, the gourd, pompion, melon, cu" cumber, and all of that race, have blossoms " distinctly male and female upon the same " plant : the male blossoms may be distinguished " from the others, in that they have not any " pistil or rudiment of fruit about them, but " have only a large thrum, covered with dust, " in their middle ; the female blossom of these
Page 5 - Root down the fds which do the office of Veins, lying between the Wood and inner Bark ; leaving, as it pafleth by, fuch Parts of its Juice as the Texture of the Bark will receive, and requires for its Support. It may be wonder'd at, that I have not taken more notice of the Pith ; which has been always accounted the principal Part of a Tree : To which I...
Page 18 - William are in some respects alike, the Farina of the one will impregnate the other, and the Seed so enlivened will produce a Plant differing from either, as may now be seen in the garden of Mr. Thomas...
Page 11 - Virtue, is evident; for it is that only which gather and lodge in the Cavities of their hind Legs to make their Wax with; and it is well known, that Wax, when it is warm, will attract to it any light Body.
Page 60 - ... face to face, and hinged together, so that they may be made to open and shut at pleasure, like the leaves of a book ; and now the glasses being thus fitted for our purpose, I shall proceed to explain the use of them. " Draw a large circle upon paper ; divide it into three, four, five, six, seven, or eight equal parts ; which being done, we may draw in every one of the divisions a figure, at our pleasure, either for garden-plats or fortifications ; as, for example, in Fig.
Page 18 - ... some respects alike, the Farina of the one will impregnate the other, and the Seed so enlivened will produce a Plant differing from either, as may now be seen in the garden of Mr. Thomas Fairchild, of Hoxton, a plant neither Sweet William nor Carnation, but resembling both equally, which was raised from the seed of a Carnation that had been impregnated by the Farina of the Sweet William.

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