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not bring constant blessing from heaven in some form on his people, and is ever close up to his Lord's side, pleading for mercies and blessings, will be successful in conveying spiritual gifts unto men, as well as faithful in his work. The writer lives and works in a great and abiding faith in these promises of God to bring forth fruit.

« The Priest to the Temple,” by George Herbert, of Bemerton parish, suggested a kind of form for this little work. His happy home, in sight of the wonderful spire of Salisbury Cathedral, miles away, shining through the vine-covered study windows of his pretty parsonage in green and beautiful England, was often in the author's mind as he wrote, as well as the thought of what Herbert left behind in the pomp and vanity of a courtier's life, that he might be simply a faithful priest of the Temple. And the gentle step and helping hand at his side, ministering good, were also as often brought to mind by the offices of love that gladdened the author's own home as he wrote.

The closing articles, contributed to the " Congregationalist” by the graceful and loving hand that presides at the Pilgrim parsonage, are added to this volume, as altogether pertinent to the church-building work.

Grateful for the favor with which the articles were received, I commend this little volume in the name of Almighty God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

C. L. GOODELL. St. Louis, Sept. 25, 1883.

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INTRODUCTION.

The voice of experience - this is the one great value of this book. It is the open avowal of convictions and methods which have been found successful in practice. Dr. Goodell as a Christian minister has occasion to thank God profoundly for what he has enabled him to do. I suppose he never thought of making a book when he wrote these papers, but he certainly has a purpose and an aim in giving himself to the work of the ministry. How sharply he brings it out in the very first sentence : " The supreme object must be the salvation of men.” And this has ever been, and ever must be, the one, living, supreme, imperative end of every true minister of Jesus Christ. " For the Son of Man is come to seek and to save that which is lost.” To convert sinners, to edify the body of Christ; aside from this he has nothing to do ; short of this he cannot stop. And he will suit his methods to his end ; and especially, and above all, he

: keep his own mind and heart in tenderest and

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quickest sympathy with Christ and his gospel. One says of Baxter, " When he spoke of weighty soul concerns, you might find his very spirit drenched therein."

“Much impressed
Himself, as conscious of his awful charge,
And anxious mainly that the flock he feeds

May feel it, too." And evidently the heart out of which these writings came is full; full of the joy of the Lord, and full of watchful, eager desire to save souls. We see our author about his work every day. He goes right on. He has no time to dally with the fascinations of æsthetics, or to pillow his head upon a lap where the strongest is sure to be shorn of his strength. He has no affection for doubts which obstruct and darken the Christian's way, and turn him aside to blaze a path a dubious and treacherous path for himself — through swamps and deserts, where no sure ray of heaven's light is seen, and no voice from above the tree-tops is heard. From beginning to end these chapters show a mind clear of that folly which assumes that a man may entertain one thing and teach another. He preaches what he believes, and believes what he preaches. "For as he thinketh in his heart so is he.” He neither criticises the church nor complains of her creeds. He neither doubts the authorship of the Pentateuch, nor denies the logic of Paul. He is not wise above what is written. He is not more liberal

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