Joseph Anstey; or, The patron and the protégé: by D.S. Henry

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Page 322 - HE that loves a rosy cheek, Or a coral lip admires, Or from star-like eyes doth seek Fuel to maintain his fires: As old Time makes these decay, So his flames must waste away. But a smooth and steadfast mind, Gentle thoughts, and calm desires, Hearts with equal love combined, Kindle never-dying fires: — Where these are not, I despise Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes.
Page 361 - All within is dark as night : In the windows is no light; And no murmur at the door, So frequent on its hinge before. Close the door, the shutters close, Or thro' the windows we shall see The nakedness and vacancy Of the dark deserted house.
Page 37 - Lift up your heads, O ye gates ; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors ; and the King of Glory shall come in. " Who is the King of Glory? The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle. " Lift up your heads, O ye gates; even lift them up, ye everlasting doors ; and the King of Glory shall come in.
Page 72 - I pity the man who can travel from Dan. to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren and so it is; and so is all the world to him, who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
Page 328 - In peace, Love tunes the shepherd's reed; In war, he mounts the warrior's steed; In halls, in gay attire is seen; In hamlets, dances on the green. Love rules the court, the camp, the grove, And men below, and saints above ; For love is heaven, and heaven is love.
Page 61 - ... part of any dead person, to be employed or used in any manner of witchcraft, sorcery, charm, or enchantment...
Page 187 - What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see what time and chance are perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands on...
Page 232 - Oft she rejects, but never once offends. Bright as the sun, her eyes the gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on all alike. Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride, Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide: If to her share some female errors fall, Look on her face, and you'll forget them all.
Page 25 - It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale ; look, love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east. Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops; I must be gone and live, or stay and die.
Page 213 - No man is the wiser for his learning : it may administer matter to work in or objects to work upon ; but wit and wisdom are born with a man.

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