British butterflies

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George Routledge, 1860 - Butterflies - 179 pages
 

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Page 155 - It is scarcely surprising that Harrison Ainsworth should have secured to himself a very wide popularity, when we consider how happily he has chosen his themes. Sometimes, by the luckiest inspiration, a romance of captivating and enthralling fascinations, such as 'Crichton,* the 'Admirable Crichton.
Page 155 - BV THE ROVING ENGLISHMAN. In fcap. 8vo, price 1*. boards. In fcap. 8vo, price 2s. boards. THE ROVING ENGLISHMAN; or, l TURKEY, by the Roving Englishman; Sketches on the Continent. | being Sketches from Life. " Who is unfamiliar with those brilliant sketches of naval, particularly the pictures of Turkish life and manners, from the pen of the ' Roving Englishman,' and who does not hail their collection into a companionable sized volume with delight ?
Page 155 - Old St. Paul's,' &c. But the readers of Mr. Ainsworth— who number thousands upon thousands— need hardly be informed of this; and now that a uniform edition of his works is published, we do not doubt but that this large number of readers even will be considerably increased.
Page 28 - Stothard learnt the art of combining colours by closely studying butterflies' wings: he would often say that no one knew what he owed to these tiny insects. A burnt stick and a barn door served Wilkie in lieu of pencil and canvas.
Page 155 - Gerstaecker's books abound in adventure and scenes of excitement; and are fully equal, in that respect, to the stories either of Marryat, Cooper, or Dana.
Page ii - Cooper constructs enthralling stories, which hold us in breathless suspense, and make our brows alternately pallid with awe and terror, or flushed with powerful emotion : when once taken up, they are so fascinating, that we must perforce read on from beginning to end, panting to arrive at the thrilling denouement."— Dublin University Magazine.
Page 155 - Continent. j being Sketches from Life. •' Who is unfamiliar with those brilliant sketches of naval, particularly the pictures of Turkish life and manners, from the pen of the ' Roving Englishman ' and who does not hail their collection into a companionable sized volume with delight ?
Page 156 - Sir Walter Scott, in speaking of Miss Edgeworth, says, that the rich humour, pathetic tenderness, and admirable tact that she displayed in her sketches of character, led him first to think that something might be attempted for his own country of the same kind with that which Miss Edgeworth fortunately achieved for hers.
Page 10 - It is impossible not to wonder, that an insect which executes them but once in its life, should execute them so well. We must necessarily conclude that it has been instructed by a GREAT MASTER ; for he who has rendered it necessary for the insect to undergo this change, has likewise given it all the requisite means for accomplishing it in safety...
Page 63 - Continental steamers, on their passage, for many hundreds of yards, while the insects strewed the decks in all directions. The flight reached England about twelve o'clock at noon, and dispersed themselves inland and along shore, darkening the air as they went. During the...

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