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IT may not be amiss to observe that, whereas many of the experiments must come under more titles than one (as the History of Plants and the History of the Art of Gardening have many things in common), it will be more convenient to investigate them with reference to Arts, and to arrange them with reference to Bodies. For I care little about the mechanical arts themselves: only about those things which they contribute to the equipment of philosophy. But these things will be better regulated as the case arises.

FINIS.

OF

THE DIGNITY AND ADVANCE MENT

OF

LEARNING.

BOOKS II. —IX.

WOL. IV. T

THE

DIVISIONS OF THE SCIEN C E S,

AND

ARGUMENTS OF THE SEVERAL CHATTERS.

BOOK TIIE SECOND.

CHAP. I. DIVISION of all Human Learning into History, Poesy, Philosophy; with reference to the three Intellectual Faculties, Memory, Imagination, Reason; and that the same division holds good likewise in Theology.

CHAP. II.

Division of History into Natural and Civil; Ecclesiastical and Literary History being included in Civil. Division of Natural History, according to its subject, into History of Generations, Preter-generations, and Arts.

CHAP. III.

Second division of Natural History, according to its use and end, into Narrative and Inductive ; and that the noblest end of Natural History is to minister and be in order to the building up of Philosophy; which end is aimed at by the Inductive. Division of the History of Generations into the History of the Heavenly Bodies, of Meteors, of the Globe of Earth and Sea, of the Masses or Greater Colleges, and of the Species or Lesser Colleges.

CHAP. Iv. Division of Civil History into Ecclesiastical, Literary, and Civil (properly so called): and that Literary History is wanting.

Precepts for the construction thereof.

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