The Gene: A Historical Perspective

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007 - Science - 188 pages
2 Reviews

Genetics is one of the most powerful scientific fields today. It is transforming how we view medicine and public health, and is producing tremendous new discoveries in biotechnology. Advances in genetics also provoke extensive ethical debates over cloning, genetic counseling, stem cell research, and privacy. But to understand these debates, it's essential to understand where these ideas came from - the ideas of the past have had tremendous influence on not just the science of genetics, but on the political and ethical debates surrounding the field. This volume in the Greenwood Guides to Great Ideas in Science series provides an accessible and thorough description of the history of genetics, and includes relevant historical ideas from the Classical era to the present day.

The Gene: A Historical Perspective provides an overview of the field of genetics, with contemporary examples of its scientific, social and economic importance, and an emphasis on the historical development of the concept of the gene. The book includes a glossary of terms, a timeline of events, and a bibliography of accessible resources for students who wish to learn more about the gene.

 

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Contents

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About the author (2007)

Ted Everson is the Program Manager for Biotechnology Studies in the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. He earned a PhD in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology from the University of Toronto, in which he explored historically the increasing use of genetic concepts and technologies in heathcare, an MS in Medical Genetics from the University of British Columbia, focusing on genetic and physical mapping of the human genome, and a BS in Biology from the University of British Columbia. In addition to several academic articles and presentations for various audiences, he is the author of Genetic Engineering: Methods, in Colin Hempstead and William Worthington, eds., Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century Technology and Genetics and Molecular Biology, in Brian Baigre, ed., History of the Exact Sciences and Mathematics.

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