Fugitive Pieces on Various Subjects: A dialogue on beauty

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Robert Dodsley
J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall, 1771 - Philosophy

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Page 115 - DEFORMED persons are commonly even with nature ; for as nature hath done ill by them, so do they by nature; being for the most part, as the Scripture saith, void of natural affection: and so they have their revenge of nature.
Page 34 - Two of far nobler shape, erect and tall, God-like erect, with native honour clad In naked majesty, seemed lords of all, And worthy seemed; for in their looks divine The image of their glorious Maker shone, Truth, wisdom, sanctitude severe and pure— Severe, but in true filial freedom placed, Whence true authority in men: though both Not equal, as their sex not equal seemed; For contemplation he and valour formed, For softness she and sweet attractive grace; He for God only, she for God in him.
Page 152 - Eggs, upon white Paper ; and then 'applying my best Microscope, plainly discerned them to be little Men and Women, exact in all their Limbs and Lineaments, and ready to offer themselves little Candidates for Life, whenever they should happen to be imbibed with Air or Nutriment, and conveyed down into the Vessels of Generation.
Page 315 - In . the Revised Statutes, the words "or otherwise" were intentionally omitted. Hence the duty of personal examination became, in all cases, imperative. So great, however, is the tax imposed by this requirement upon the time of...
Page 29 - Soul is, but we fcarce know what it is ; every Judge of Beauty can point out Grace; but no one that I know of has ever yet fixt upon a Definition for it.
Page 25 - Writer very well exprefles it) " A Soul upon their Countenances," which does not appear when they are abfent from each other; or even when they are together, converfing with other Perfons, that are indifferent to them, or rather lay a Reftraint upon their Features. , I dare fay you begin to fee the Preference, that the Beauty of the Paffions has over the Two Parts of Beauty...
Page 23 - ... the cruel and unkind ones add to deformity; and it is on this account that good nature may, very juftly, be faid to be c 'the belt feature, even in the fineft face.
Page 35 - In beauty, that of favour is more than that of colour, and that of decent and gracious motion more than that of favour.
Page 51 - Have faces flush'd with more exalted charms ; The sun that rolls his chariot o'er their heads, Works up more fire and colour in their cheeks ; Were you with these, my prince, you'd soon forget The pale, unripen'd beauties of the North.
Page 69 - Risings and Hills are sprinkled with Trees ; and particularly with Flowering Trees, which are here very common. The sides of the Canals, or lesser Streams, are not faced (as they are with us) with smooth Stone, and in a...

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