The Visitors' New Guide to the Spa of Leamington Priors, and Its Vicinity ...: With ... an Analysis and Professional Dissertation Upon the Nature, Properties, and Cures, Performed by the Waters

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Page 210 - ... and buttress, alternately, Seem framed of ebon and ivory; When silver edges the imagery, And the scrolls that teach thee to live and die; When distant Tweed is heard to rave, And the owlet to hoot o'er the dead man's grave, Then go— but go alone the while — Then view St. David's ruined pile ; And, home returning, soothly swear, Was never scene so sad and fair ! n.
Page 204 - The bed of the lake is but a rushy swamp ; and the massive ruins of the Castle only serve to show what their splendour once was, and to impress on the musing visitor the transitory value of human possessions, and the happiness of those who enjoy a humble lot in virtuous contentment.
Page 241 - His father was a butcher, and I have been told heretofore by some of the neighbours that when he was a boy he exercised his father's trade, but when he killed a calf he would do it in a high style, and make a speech.
Page 204 - The external wall of this royal castle was, on the south and west sides, adorned and defended by a lake partly artificial, across which Leicester had constructed a stately bridge, that Elizabeth might enter the castle by a path hitherto untrodden, instead of the usual entrance to the northward, over which he had erected a gate-house, or barbican, which still exists, and is equal "in extent, and superior in architecture, to the baronial castle of many a northern chief.
Page 223 - Stand, never overlook'd our favourite elms, That screen the herdsman's solitary hut; While far beyond, and overthwart the stream, That, as with molten glass, inlays the vale, The sloping land recedes into the clouds; Displaying on its varied side the grace Of hedge-row beauties numberless, square tower, Tall spire, from which the sound of cheerful bells Just undulates upon the listening ear; Groves, heaths, and smoking villages remote.
Page 161 - Snatch'd through the verdant maze, the hurried eye Distracted wanders ; now the bowery walk Of covert close, where scarce a speck of day Falls on the lengthen'd gloom, protracted sweeps : Now meets the bending sky ; the river now Dimpling along, the breezy-ruffled lake, The forest darkening round, the glittering spire, The' ethereal mountain, and the distant main.
Page 210 - When the broken arches are black in night, And each shafted oriel glimmers white; When the cold light's uncertain shower Streams on the ruined central tower; When buttress and buttress, alternately, Seem framed of ebon and ivory ; When silver edges the imagery, And the scrolls that teach thee to live and die...
Page 110 - Of household smoke, your eye excursive roams ; Wide-stretching from the hall in whose kind haunt The hospitable Genius lingers still, To where the broken landscape, by degrees Ascending, roughens into rigid hills...
Page 244 - A parliament member, a justice of peace, " At home a poor scare-crow, at London an asse, '' If lowsie is Lucy, as some volke miscalle it, " Then Lucy is lowsie whatever befall it : " He thinks himself greate, " Yet an asse in his state, " We allowe by his ears but with asses to mate, " If Lucy is lowsie, as some volke miscalle it, " Sing lowsie Lucy, whatever befall it.
Page 203 - ... court, and bearing in the names attached to each portion of the magnificent mass, and in the armorial bearings which were there blazoned, the emblems of mighty chiefs who had long passed away, and whose history, could Ambition have lent ear to it, might have read a lesson to the haughty favorite, who had now acquired and was augmenting the fair domain.

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