First part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Second part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Third part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) King Edward IV, by Heywood. King Richard III, by Shakespeare. Perkin Warbeck, by Ford. King Henry VIII, by Shakespeare and Fletcher

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Thomas Donovan
Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1896 - English drama
 

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Page 181 - Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them...
Page 71 - Be brave, then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny ; the three-hooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make it felony to drink small beer...
Page 188 - All scatter'd in the bottom of the sea. Some lay in dead men's skulls; and, in those holes Where eyes did once inhabit, there were crept (As 'twere in scorn of eyes,) reflecting gems, That woo'd the slimy bottom of the deep, And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by.
Page 187 - That, as I am a Christian faithful man, I would not spend another such a night, Though 'twere to buy a world of happy days : So full of dismal terror was the time.
Page 303 - But far beyond my depth : my high-blown pride At length broke under me, and now has left me, Weary and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream, that must for ever hide me. Vain pomp and glory of this world, I hate ye : I feel my heart new open'd. O ! how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes
Page 305 - Love thyself last : cherish those hearts that hate thee ; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends, thou aim'st at, be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's ; then if thou fall'st, 0 Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr.
Page 303 - Farewell ! a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is the state of man : to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hope, to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him : The third day comes a frost, a killing frost, And, — when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a-ripening, — nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
Page 303 - Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders, This many summers in a sea of glory ; But far beyond my depth ; my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me, Weary, and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream, that must for ever hide me.
Page 91 - So many hours must I take my rest ; So many hours must I contemplate; So many hours must I sport myself ; So many days my ewes have been with young ; So many weeks ere the poor fools will...
Page 181 - And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days. I am determined to prove a villain, And hate the idle pleasures of these days.

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