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exercises in declamation and elocution: in fact, I have little faith in such exercises, save in connection with the attainment of something higher and better. For manner, to be really good, must be held subordinate to matter; and the pursuit of manner for its own sake, or even as a paramount aim, can hardly fail to result in a very bad manner. I submit that the art, or the habit, of pronouncing nothing in such a way as to make it pass for something grand, is not so little known among us as to call for special encouragement and aid by books and teachers. At present we seem to be in no little danger of educating people into a good deal more tongue than mind.

In conclusion, it may not be amiss to say that this volume is not designed for any “auction of popularity.” The thought of popular favour has had no part or lot in the preparation of it. For I know right well that, in preparations of this sort, a great many people altogether prefer something which may seem to teach a little of every thing, while really giving no true instruction whatever. So the most I venture to hope for is, that the book may commend itself to the judicious; the number of whom, I fear, is not large enough to make up any thing like a popularity. And this leads me to remark that our young students, it seems to me, can be better occupied than with the transient, shifting literary fashions and popularities of the day. I am not myself a very aged man, yet I am old enough to have outlived two generations of “immortal” writers who have already sunk into oblivion; and of the popular authors now living probably very few will be heard of thirty years hence. Surely, in forming the mind and taste of the young, it is better to use authors who have already lived long enough to afford some guaranty that they may survive the next twenty years.

BOSTON, January, 1876.

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B U R K E.

Page, Sketch of his Life . . . - - - - . . 1 Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol e e e e 9 How to retain the Colonies . . . . . . . 47 The People of New England . - s - - - 49 Speech on Economical Reform - - • - - . 50 Obedience to Instructions . - - - - - - 113 Speech to the Electors of Bristol . - - - - . 115 Growth of the American Trade . . . . . . 152 Character of George Grenville - - - - - . 154 Lord Chatham and Charles Townshend . . . . 155 State of Things in France . . . . . . . 159 The Revolution in France . . . . . . . 163 Viberty in the Abstract . . . . . . . . 190 freedom as an Inheritance . . . . . . . 192 The Revolutionary Third Estate . . . . . . 198 The Rights of Men - - - - - - - - 204 Abuse of History - - - - - - - - . 207 English Toleration . - - - - - - - - 209 How a Wise Statesman proceeds . . . . . . 211 True Principles of Reform . - - - - - - 213 Fanaticism of Liberty . . . . . . . . 217 The Ethics of Vanity . . . . . . . . 219

The Old and the New Whigs . . . . . . . 226

A Letter to a Noble Lord . . - - - e - 248

France at War with Humanity • e e - - . 285

Fanatical Atheism . - - - - - - - . 296

How to deal with Jacobin France . . . . . . 298 ix

FROM THE ESSAYS .

Page.
Of Nature in Men . . . t - . . . 604
Of Custom and Education . . . . . . 605
Of Youth and Age . . . . . . . . 607
Of Beauty . - - - - - - - - 608
Of Deformity . . - - - - - - . 609

Of Studies . - - - - - - - - 610
Of Praise . . . . . . . . . . 611
Of Judicature . . . . . . . . 618
Of Anger . - - - - - - - - ... 616

FROM THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING:

Discredits of Learning • * * * * , 618
Dignity and Value of Knowledge . . . . 624
Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . 832

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