An advanced manual of teaching for teachers of elementary and higher schools

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National Society's Depository, 1880

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Page 30 - AWAKE, my St John ! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die...
Page 48 - Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield, Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has broke ; How jocund did they drive their team afield ! How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy stroke ! Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys and destiny obscure.
Page 54 - The [*418] royal navy of England hath ever been its greatest defence and ornament ; it is its ancient and natural strength ; the floating bulwark of the island...
Page 30 - The latent tracts, the giddy heights explore Of all who blindly creep, or sightless soar; Eye Nature's walks, shoot folly as it flies, And catch the manners living as they rise : Laugh where we must, be candid where we can; 15 But vindicate the ways of God to man.
Page 32 - Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam, qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur.
Page 9 - How to live? — that is the essential question for us. Not how to live in the mere material sense only, but in the widest sense. The general problem which comprehends every special problem is — the right ruling of conduct in all directions under all circumstances.
Page 9 - To prepare us for complete living is the function which education has to discharge; and the only rational mode of judging of any educational course is, to judge in what degree it discharges such function.
Page 9 - In what way to treat the body; in what way to treat the mind; in what way to manage our affairs; in what way 'to bring up a family; in what way to behave as a citizen ; in what way to utilize all those sources of happiness which Nature supplies; how to use all our faculties to the greatest advantage of ourselves and others; how to live completely. And this being the great thing needful for us to learn, is, by consequence, the great thing which education has to teach.
Page 27 - ... itself by nature is, or hath in it harmony ; a thing which delighteth all ages, and beseemeth all states; a thing as seasonable in grief as in joy ; as decent, being added unto actions of greatest weight and solemnity, as being used when men most sequester themselves from action.
Page 34 - Elizabethan writers : — that, lastly, to what was thus inherited they added a richness in language and a variety in metre, a force and fire in narrative, a tenderness and bloom in feeling, an insight into the finer passages of the Soul and the inner meanings of the landscape, a larger and wiser Humanity,— hitherto scarcely attained, and perhaps unattainable even by predecessors of not inferior individual genius.

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