Book I of The Faery Queene

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Clarendon Press, 1869 - 251 pages

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Page 10 - At length they chaunst to meet upon the way An aged Sire, in long blacke weedes yclad, His feete all bare, his beard all hoarie gray, And by his belt his booke he hanging had ; Sober he seemde, and very sagely sad, And to the ground his eyes were lowly bent, Simple in shew, and voide of malice bad, And all the way he prayed, as he went, And often knockt his brest, as one that did repent.
Page 69 - And oft, for dread of hurt, would him advise The angry beastes not rashly to despise, Nor too much to provoke ; for he would learne The Lyon stoup to him in lowly wise, (A lesson hard) and make the Libbard sterne Leave roaring, when in rage he for revenge did earne.
Page 4 - Behind her farre away a Dwarfe did lag, That lasie seemd, in being ever last, Or wearied with bearing of her bag Of needments at his backe.
Page 168 - Abhorred Styx, the flood of deadly hate; Sad Acheron, of sorrow, black and deep; Cocytus, named of lamentation loud Heard on the rueful stream; fierce Phlegethon, Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage.
Page 3 - Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore, And dead, as living, ever him ador'd : Upon his shield the like was also scor'd, For soveraine hope which in his helpe he had. Right faithfull true he was in deede and word, But of his cheere did seeme too solemne sad; Yet nothing did he dread, but ever was ydrad.
Page 152 - The blazing brightnesse of her beauties beame, And glorious light of her sunshyny face, To tell, were as to strive against the streame: My ragged rimes are all too rude and bace Her heavenly lineaments for to enchace. Ne wonder; for her own deare loved knight, All were she dayly with himselfe in place, Did wonder much at her celestial! sight: Oft had he seene her faire, but never so faire dight.
Page 8 - Her vomit full of bookes and papers was, With loathly frogs and toades, which eyes did lacke, And creeping sought way in the weedy gras : Her filthie parbreake all the place defiled has.
Page 114 - Come, come away, fraile, feeble, fleshly wight, Ne let vaine words bewitch thy manly hart) Ne divelish thoughts dismay thy constant spright. In heavenly mercies hast thou not a part ? Why shouldst thou then despeire, that chosen art?
Page 11 - A little lowly Hermitage it was, Downe in a dale, hard by a forests side, Far from resort of people, that did pas In...
Page 3 - To prove his puissance in battell brave Upon his foe, and his new force to learne; Upon his foe, a Dragon horrible and stearne.

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