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19216

PRESS OF THE NEW ERA PRINTING COMPANY

LANCASTER. PA.

THE TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB

OFFICERS FOR 1908

President,
HENRY H. RUSBY, M.D.

Vice-Presidents, EDWARD S. BURGESS, PH.D. JOHN HENDLEY BARNHART, A.M., M.D.

Recording Secretary,
C. STUART GAGER, PH.D.
Botanical Garden, Bronx Park, New York City.

Editor,
MARSHALL AVERY HOWE, PH.D.
Botanical Garden, Bronx Park,

New York City.

Treasurer, WILLIAM MANSFIELD, PHAR.D College of Pharmacy, 115 West 68th St.,

New York City.

Associate Editors, JOHN H. BARNHART, A.M., M.D. TRACY ELLIOT HAZEN, PH.D. JEAN BROADHURST, A.M.

WM. ALPHONSO MURRILL, PH.D. PHILIP DOWELL, Ph.D.

CHARLES LOUIS POLLARD, A.M. ALEX. W. EVANS, M.D., PH.D. HERBERT M. RICHARDS, S.D.

Meetings the second Tuesday and last Wednesday of each month alternately at the

American Museum of Natural History and the New York Botanical Garden.

PUBLICATIONS. Bulletin. Monthly, established 1870. Price $3.00 per year; single numbers 30 cents. Of former volumes only 24-33 can be supplied entire. Certain numbers of other volumes are available, and the completion of sets will be undertaken.

Memoirs. A series of technical papers published at irregular intervals, established 1889. Price $3.00 per volume.

Torreya. Monthly, established 1901. Price $1.00 per year.

All business correspondence relating to the above publications should be addressed to William Mansfield, Treasurer, College of Pharmacy, 115 W. 68th St., New York City.

ERRATA, VOLUME 8

Page 25, 2d line from bottom (footnote), for No. 2, read No. I.
Page 54, ioth line, for yellew read yellow.
Page 60, ist line, insert a hyphen at the end of the line.
Page 102, 3d line, for matricariaefolium read neglectum.
Page 125, last line (footnote), complete the brackets.
Page 155, last line, for successively read successfully.

Page 163, 12th line from bottom, for The problems read The progress.

Page 195, Ioth line, for others read other.
Page 207, 12th line from bottom, for Lause read Lancelot.
Page 217, last line, for ew read New.
Page 218, 7th line, for OEningen read Oeningen.
Page 232, 6th line, for Karston read Karsten.

Page 233, 2d line from bottom (footnote), for Radioactivity and Life read “ Radioactivity and Life”.

Page 237, 2d line, for Linnaeusread Linnaeus.
Page 237, 3d line, for Specific read Specific.
Page 246, 5th line, omit comma before are.

Page 250, end of the 12th line from bottom, substitute comma for the period.

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DATES OF PUBLICATION

No. I, for January.

February.
March.
April.
May.
June.

July.
No. 8, August.

September.
October.
November.
December.

No. 2,
No. 3,
No. 4,
No. 5,
No. 6,
No. 7,

Pages 1-24.

25-40. 41-64.

65-92. 93–124. 125-152. 153–180. 181-208. 209-232. 233–252. 253–276. 277–315.

Issued January 27, 1908.

February 26, 1908.
March 27, 1908.
April 29, 1908.
May 19, 1908.
June 30, 1908.

July 29, 1908.
September 1, 1908.
September 26, 1908.

October 22, 1908. November 25, 1908.

January 6, 1909.

No. 9, No. 10, No. II, No. 12,

January, 1908

Vol. 8.

No. 1.

THE PINE-BARRENS OF BABYLON AND ISLIP,

LONG ISLAND

By ROLAND M. HARPER

To the botanist who regards a habitat merely as a place where certain species of plants may be found, the pine-barrens to be described below possess few attractions, for their flora is not very rich, and nearly all the species are pretty widely distributed and well known. But to the phytogeographer every habitat that has not been too much disfigured by civilization is of interest, whether its plants are few or many, common or rare; so no apology is necessary for publishing the following notes.

The pine-barrens of Long Island are very easy of access, but they seem never to have been adequately described, chiefly for the reason given above. Brief references to them occur in some old historical works, such as B. F. Thompson's History of Long Island (1839), on page 16 of which is the following statement : “There is another extensive tract lying eastward from the Hempstead plains, and reaching to the head of Peconic Bay, composed so entirely of sand as to seem in a great measure incapable of profitable cultivation by any process at present known.”

The first distinct published list of Long Island pine-barren plants seems to be that of Dr. N. L. Britton (Bull. Torrey Club 7: 82. 1880), who selected from Miller & Young's flora of Suffolk County, N. Y. (published in 1874) 46 species which he had found in New Jersey and on Staten Island to be confined to the coastal plain, or nearly so. Essentially the same list was copied by Dr. Arthur Hollick in 1893 (Trans. N. Y. Acad. Sci.

[No. 12, Vol. 7, of TORREYA, comprising pages 225-258, was issued January 16, 1908.]

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