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DANIEL BURGESS & co.'s PUBLICATIONS.

From J. H. Brown, A. M., Principal, Zane-street Boy's School, Philadelphia, and

President of Pennsylvania Stute Teachers' Association. It is with more than ordinary interest that I have examined Tower's series of books. His Readers could only have been written by one who had patiently led his pupils through the gradual steps needful to make good readers. “ Make haste slowly,” is eminently true in teaching to read.

Mr. Tower's Grammars and Algebra are both well adapted to awaken thought, and draw forth the latent energies of the pupil. Books for schools should be written only by those experienced in teaching; they alone know the wants of the school-room

From ALFRED S. KENNEDY, Principal, Central Institute, Philadelphia. I have been favored with copies of Tower's Readers, and find them prepared on the right plan.

We pay much attention to elocution, and our pupils are living evidences of the efficacy of teaching one thing at a time, drilling frequently on the elements, and exercising on animated varied composition. All this is recommended and provided for in this series, and I therefore heartily recommend them to all teachers who would aid in a reform as much needed, perhaps, any other, to wit-a reform in the art of reading.

Me. David B. Tower :

Dear Sir-The School Committee of the town of Springfield have examined with much interest your series of Reading Books, Gradual Speller, and Intellectual Algebra, and have unanimously voted to introduce them into the public schools under their superintendence. As a whole, we consider the series one of the very best within our knowledge, and it is our desire that the children of the town may be thoroughly taught according to the principles upon which you have proceeded. We regard your Intellectual Algebra as a most valuable work. It effectually teaches scholars the art of thinking, which, after all, is the most important thing to be learned. For my own part, I can only add a hearty wish that your books may have the extensive circulation which they deserve.

Very respectfully,

HENRY W. LEE,
Chairman School Committee, Springfield.

These volumes abound in extracts from the most polished and renowned authors in the English language, taking in American as well as English productions, and placing them in a galaxy of moral splendor that charms the intellect while it Alls the soul with those grand and undefined emotions of sublimity which ally humanity to the Divinity. --Concordia Intelligencer.

These books make a most excellent series of reading books for young children. Mr Tower, the author, is one of the ablest and most experienced instructors of youth in the whole Union, and his books have everywhere been favorably received.-Nacog. doches (Texas) Chronicle.

DANIEL BURGESS & Co.'s PUBLICATIONS.

The “Gradual Reader" is one of the most useful books in our schools—so admirably is it adapted to the training of the voice. Its exercises, in the hands of a good teacher, can hardly fail to give purity of tone and distinctness of articulation. But this book, so far as the reading lessons are concerned, is designed for the smaller classes. And in many schools the next reading book used is the North American Second Class Reader. Now the “Sequel" is designed to precede the Second Class Reader. This is much needed. The selections are judicious. Messrs. Tower and Walker understand their profession, and have acquired honor in it; for it is not too much to affirm that the Park Latin School and the Wells Grammar School, of which they are the principals, are among the best of our educational institutions. None are more competent to produce a school book really valuable. We confidently recommend this book to school committees.-Boston Post.

Tower's Gradual Primer, Gradual Reader, and Gradual Speller, ninth and eleventh editions. This is an excellent series of works, for scholars in the rudiments of edu cation. We have submitted them to a teacher of experience, who thinks them unequalled, in some respects, by any primary works in use, and who strongly recommends that our merchants shall include them in their book purchases. He says—“In Tower's series the lessons are arranged in such order, as that children of the most moderats capacity can without any trouble proceed from one lesson to another as the mind gradually develops. I had supposed that McGuffey's series afforded every thing that was desirable for children, though the second Reader did not follow the first in that close succession which is required by children; but Tower's first and second Readers seem to me to supply every wish of the Teacher, and justly to deserve the most unqualified approbation of all who are engaged in the instruction of youth. I would strongly recommend their introduction by our merchants.”—Northern Standard.

This series consists of six books, with lessons arranged in regular graduation. Each book seems to be well adapted to the class of scholars for which it is designed. The lessons are neither too difficult nor too easy. The first four books contain exercises designed to give thorough practice upon the elementary sounds, and their combinations. Papils who are faithfully drilled in these, can not fail in one essential requisite of good reading-distinct utterance. These books, in this respect, are certainly superior to any with which we are acquainted. The last two give the principles of elocution, and in a manner well adapted to school wants. The selections for reading are made with much taste. As a whole, we consider this an excellent series of reading books. They have evidently been prepared with great care, and by those who were perfectly com. putent for the work they undertook.-Christian Register.

As a means of elevating the character of our schools, it is essential that they be furnished with a judicious selection of books. It is only secondary to the importance of naving them supplied with competent and faithful teachers. The books used should be well adapted to the purposes of teaching. Especially is it important that the Readers be unquestionably the best. The selections should contain pure thoughts and refined sentiments. They should be such a character as will improve th under standing, elevate the feelings, move the affections, and inspire the pupil with a regard for what is excellent, and thus tend to make him wiser, happier, and better.

We therefore take pleasure in calling the attention of teachers and committees to DANIEL BURGESS & co.'s PUBLICATIONS.

Tower's series of Renders. The first books of this series are admirably adapted to the wants of the pupils for whom they are intended. The selections are sufficiently simple ubel easy, but never tame and affected. They are well written, and free from trivial fuults, and, what is most important, are suited to produce the best moral effect. The lessons and exercises, forming a complete system of articulation, are arranged and illustrated in such a way that the teacher can readily make a child understand them, and thus aid in removing his faults, and secure his future progress.

The books for the more advanced classes are the best we have examined. The Bt-veral articles of elocutionary matter, occupying some fifty or sixty pages in each book, may be read with pleasure and profit. The author has shown himself a critic, not only competent to point out the real faults and material errors of many “Readers” now in use, but also to prepare one in a high degree superior to those he is capable of censuring

He has exhibited a capacity for relishing the productions of genius, which is a sign of good taste, and also for developing the principles of good reading, by which such productions may be made to have their legitimate influence over the mind and feelings of the pupil. He has done this so well, that teachers and pupils must be profited by the study of his work-must be profited, unless they neither know the value, nor can conceive the reality of such principles, like one ignorant of the first truths of philosa phy, who, finding the sensible horizon a plane surface, can form no idea of the spheroid form of the whole, which he does not see, and laughs at the account of the antipodes, which he can not comprehend.

The selections are from authors who are considered as standards in their respective departments. The graces of language are indeed considered, but never as an equivalent for sound moral principle. Many of the pieces exhibit at the same time a smoothness and an energy, at once alluring and stirring, and are calculated in an eminent degree to elevate the morals and refine the taste of the pupil. We therefore like these books for their well-written and well-chosen lessons of morals and taste-lessons pleasant and appropriate, and full of good sense. We like them, because they contain none of that miscellaneous trash too current in our reading books, which is useful only lo steal away the time, and injure the best foelings of our children. In conclusion, we recommend the books as seriously instructive, as well as highly interesting, and whoever will examine, will find they contain fewer faults than most books of a similar character.- Watchman and Reflector.

It is a fact universally conceded, not only by the State and County Superintendents und School Committees, but even by teachers themselves, that the reading in our chools is generally bad ; meaning by this exprossion that it is indistinct, inaudible, monotonous, unexpressive, unmeaning. The fault, of course, is charged on the teachers, ind the teachers attribute the fault to the character of the reading book used by the hildren. The selections in the whole series of books, from the lowest to the highest, are not well adapted to the capacity of the children. The selections are to a very great xtent uninteresting, sometimes too didactic, and frequently childless, unmeaning, flat, ind even silly. Consequently it is impossible for any teacher to get up the least enthusiasm among his pupils, who have been stultified by aring the same dull production of some poetaster or anonymous versifier read or said over for the hundredth time. It was thought by experienced teachers and individuals, who were interested in the cause of education, that a series of Readers might be made that would remove the evi!

DANIE)

BURGESS & co.'s PUBLICATIONS.

complained of. It was thought that the series should contain a suitable number of books, properly graded, so that the steps from the lowest book to the highest, should be gradual, short, and easy, that the selections should be of a brilliant, vivid, sprightly, instruetive, and, as far as might be, æsthetic character. It was thought that every piece should be of such a kind and character that, when read, it would call forth some effort on the part both of teacher and pupil. It was thought that the selections in the higher books of the series, in particular, should contain the productions of the most gised minds, when the whole strength of the intellect was put forth, lavishing upon The creations of an exuberant fancy all the richness of a poetic diction. Such selections would exercise the feelings, the fancy, the affections, and the intelligence anew, on each perusal, and at the same time would no more tire contemplation than the most beautiful and sublime scenes in the universe would tire the sight. It was thought that such a series of Readers, wherein nothing should be found that was loose in style, faulty in construction, and wanting in sense, would do much to elevate the condition of our schools. It was thought that wherever they were introduced, they would commend themselves so strongly to public favor that no more changes in the reading books would be called for, and thus a great inconvenience would be avoided. It was further thought that if, in addition to the above excellences, the series should contaju a comprehensive treatise on elocution, wherein the acknowledged and essential principles of reading should be properly arranged, clearly defined, and well illustrated by appropriate examples, provided some one of acknowledged ability, distinguished excellence, of well-tried experience would undertake the task, the question in regard to the best series of Readers for our schools would not only be finally settled, but much would be done wward creating a just relish for, and proper appreciation of, whatever can refine che taste, improve the understanding, and elevate the feelings.

We have had our attention called to a series of Paders recently completed by D. B. Tower and Cornelius Walker, both distinguished teachers in Boston, in which all the above excellences are combined.

Now we venture to say that no teacher who is qualified for his position, and determined to make use of the best means within his reach, would at all hesitate in prolivuncing this series of Readers by far the most excellent of any that has been presented in the public.

We can not omit to notice in a particular manner the excellences of the selections found in the fourth Reader, intended for the middle classes in common schools. Never before have we seen a book intended for this section of the common schools in any degree whatever so well adapted to the capacity of the pupil, and at the same time so well calculated to interest the children, to call forth their powers and exercise their feelings, as this book does.

The treatise on the subject of emphasis alone in this series, if nothing else, is sufficient to recommend these Readers to every teacher, to every scholar, and to every public speaker. But it is not for us to speak more in detail. We can only cɔmmend them to the attentive perusal and critical examination of every teacher and school committee, and we feel sure that he will agree with us in pronouncing this series one that in point of excellence can not be surpassed.

The authors have proved themselves teachers of high accomplishments, of deep and earnest purpose, and in presenting this series of Readers they have accolaplished what will be a lasting benefit to the cause of education; and so long as good reading ana good speaking shall be appreciated, so long, we think, this series of Readers wi commend itself to public favor.- Christian Witness and Church Advocate.

DANIEL BURGESS & Co.'s PUBLICATIONS.

THE FOLLOWING CITIES AND TOWNS

ARE SOME OF THE PLACES WIIERE

TOWER'S SERIES OF READERS

ARE USED IN WHOLE OR IN PART.

MASSACHUSETTS.
AS TEXT BOOKS IN THE BOSTON NORMAL SCHOOLS.
BOSTON,
ROCKPORT,

STONEHAM,
CHARLESTOWN, ROWLEY,

WALTHAM, LOWELL,

SWAMPSCOTT, WEST CAMRRIDGE, CAMBRIDGE, BEDFORD,

WOBURN,
SALEM,
FRAMINGHAM,

BARRE,
WORCESTER, GROTON,

DUDLEY,
NEW-BEDFORD, LEXINGTON, SPENCER,
ROXBURY,
LINCOLN,

STIRLING,
TAUNTON,

MARLBOROUGH, BROOKLINE,
FALL RIVER, MEDFORD,

DEDHAM,
CHELSEA,
MELROSE,

MILTON,
NORTH CHELSEA, NEWTON,

WEST ROXBURY, BEVERLY, READING,

DIGHTON, BRADFORD,

SOUTH READING, NANTUCKET,
DANVERS,

SOMERVILLE, CLINTON,
CONCORD,
GRAFTON,

WESTBORO,
NATICK,

ATTLEBOROUGH, REHOBOTH, TOPSFIELD,

MANCHESTER, ABINGTON. MEDWAY,

WALPOLE, STOUGHTON, HOLLISTON, [The above towns comprise one-half of the population of the State.]

AND ARE USED TO A CONSIDERABLE EXTENT IN Maine,

New

Jersey, Kentucky,
New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Tennessee,
Vermont,
Maryland,

South Carolina,
Rhode Island, Virginia,

Georgia,
Connecticut, Ohio,

Louisiana,
New-York,
Indiana,

Mississippi, Iowa

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