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" Charles, that he never said a foolish thing nor ever did a wise one : A censure which, though too far carried, seems to have some foundation in his character and deportment. "
The history of England, from the invasion of Julius Csar to the revolution ... - Page 212
by David Hume - 1812
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 90

1849
...— this was to be imputed ' to the indolence of his temper, — a fault which, however unfor' tunate in a monarch, it is impossible for us to regard with great •' severity.' He starts in his history of James the Second, by stating plainly that he never was sincere in his intentions...
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A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland ..., Volume 1

Horace Walpole - English literature - 1806
...win the hearts, when he could no longer gain the esteem of mankind6. Rochester's epigrammatic jest, that " he never said a foolish thing, nor ever did a wise one," forms a tolerable motto for his "picture in little." Dryden, however, did not scruple to laud him in...
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The Oxford review; or, Literary censor, Volume 1

...the hearts, when he could no longer gain the esteem of mankind. f Rochester's epigrammatic jest, ' that he never said a foolish thing, nor ever did a wise one,' forms a tolerable motto for his picture in little." The following short letter addressed to ae;i:eat...
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The Monthly repository (and review)., Volume 16

1821
...candidly examined, be imputed, in a great measure, to the indolence of his temper ; a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible for us to regard with great severity." In a paragraph, which almost instantly follows, the historian intimates, that Charles II. had an "appetite...
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The Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature, Volume 16

Liberalism (Religion) - 1821
...candidly examined, be imputed, in a great measure, to the indolence of his temper ; a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible for us to regard with great severity." In a paragraph, which almost instantly follows, the historian intimates, that Charles II. had an "appetite...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Pieces of Poetry

Vicesimus Knox - English prose literature - 1824 - 788 pages
...candidly examined, be imputed, in a great measure, to the indolence of his temper ; a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible...regard with great severity. It has been remarked of this king, that he never said a foolish thing, nor ever did a wise one : a censure, which, though too...
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The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the ..., Volume 8

David Hume - Great Britain - 1825
...candidly examined, be imputed, in a great measure, to the indolence of his temper — a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible...of Charles, that he never said a foolish thing nor never did a wise one ; a censure which, though too far carried, seems to have some foundation in his...
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The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the ..., Volume 10

David Hume, Tobias Smollett, William Jones - Great Britain - 1828
...candidly examined, be imputed, in a great measure, to the indolence of his temper : a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible for us to regard with great severity. 15 Duke of Buckingham. It has been remarked of Charles, that he never said a foolish thing nor ever...
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An Ecclesiastical History of Great Britain: Chiefly of England ..., Volume 8

Jeremy Collier - Great Britain - 1841
...candidly examined, be imputed in a great measure to the indolence of his temper : — a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible...of Charles, that he never said a foolish thing nor did a wise one ; a censure which, though too far carried, seems to have some foundation in hi character...
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“An” Ecclesiastical History of Great Britain, Chiefly of England ..., Volume 8

Jeremy Collier - Great Britain - 1841
...candidly examined, be imputed in a great measure to the indolence of his temper : — a fault which, however unfortunate in a monarch, it is impossible...of Charles, that he never said a foolish thing nor did a wise one; — a censure which, though too far carried, seems to have some foundation in his character...
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