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worthy of conquest. Solitary, they keep the desert to themselves alone: it is as extraordinary to see two pair of eagles in the same mountain, as two lions in the same forest. They keep separate to find a more ample supply, and consider the quantity of their game as the best proof of their dominion. Bred for war, they are the enemies of all society; alike fierce, proud, and incapable of

being easily tamed.

1. In one of those terrible eruptions of "Mount AEtna, which have often happened, the danger of the inhabitants of the adjacent country was uncommonly great. To avoid immediate destruction from the flames, and the melted lava which ran down the sides of the mountain, the people were obliged to retire to a considerable distance. Amidst the hurry and confusion of such a scene (every one fleeing and carrying away whatever he deemed most precious), two brothers, in the height of their solicitude for the preservation of their wealth and goods, suddenly recollected that their father and mother, both very old, were unable to save themselves by flight. Filial tenderness triumphed over every other consideration. “Where,” cried the generous youths, “shall we find a more precious treasure than they are, who gave us being, and who have cherished and protected us through life?” Having said this, the one took up his father on his shoulders, and the other his mother, and happily made their way through the surrounding smoke and flames. All who were witnesses of this dutiful and affectionate conduct, were struck with the highest admiration; and they and their posterity ever after called the path which these young men took in their retreat, “The Field of the Pious.”

2. Among other excellent arguments for the immortality of the soul, there is one drawn from its perpetual progress toward perfection, without a possibility of ever arriving at it, which I do not remember to have seen opened and improved by others, who have written on this subject, though it seems to me to carry very great weight with it. How can it enter into the thoughts of a man, that the soul, which is capable of such immense perfections, and of receiving new improvements to all eternity, shall fall away into nothing, almost as soon as it is created 2 A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present. Were a human soul thus at a stand in her accomplishments; were her faculties to be full blown, and incapable of farther enlargement; I

ExERCISES.

which inhabit foreign regions, went to a neighbouring city to see an exhibition of wild beasts. “What is the name of that lovely animal,” said he to the keeper, “which you have placed near one of the ugliest beasts in your collection, as if you meant to contrast beauty with deformity?”—“The animal which you admire,” replied the keeper, “is called a tiger; and, notwithstanding the meekness of his looks, he is fierce and savage beyond description. But the other beast, which you despise, is in the highest degree docile, affectionate, and useful. For the benefit of man, he traverses the sandy deserts of Arabia, where drink and pasture are seldom to be found, and will continue several days without sustenance, yet still patient of labour. The camel, therefore (for such is the name given to this animal), is more worthy of your admiration than the tiger, notwithstanding the inelegance of his imake, and the two bunches upon his back : for mere external beauty is of little estimation; and deformity, when associated with amiable dispositions and useful qualities, should not preclude our respect and approbation.”

SECTION V.
ABRIDGMENT or complex sent ENCEs (continued).

Abridge the following passages by writing in each sentence the principal clause, and such secondary clauses only as the sense may require:—*

EXAMPLE.

Sir Philip Sidney, at the battle near Zutphen, was wounded by a musket-ball, which broke the bone of his thigh. He was carried about a mile and a half to the camp; and being faint with the loss of blood, and probably parched with thirst, through the heat of the weather, he called for drink. It was immediately brought to him: but as he was putting the vessel to his mouth, a poor wounded soldier, who happened at that instant to be carried past him, looked up to it with wistful eyes. The gallant and generous Sidney took the bottle from his mouth, and delivered it to the soldier, saying, “Thy necessity is yet greater than mine.”

* In exercises like this, the Teacher may suggest whether the secondary clauses should be adjective, relative, participial, adverbial, connective, absolute, apposition, or parenthetical.

worthy of conquest. Solitary, they keep the desert to themselves alone: it is as extraordinary to see two pair of eagles in the same mountain, as two lions in the same forest. They keep separate to find a more ample supply, and consider the quantity of their game as the best proof of their dominion. Bred for war, they are the enemies of all society; alike fierce, proud, and incapable of

being easily tamed,

1. In one of those terrible eruptions of 'Mount AEtna, which have often happened, the danger of the inhabitants of the adjacent country was uncommonly great. To avoid immediate destruction from the flames, and the melted lava which ran down the sides of the mountain, the people were obliged to retire to a considerable distance. Amidst the hurry and confusion of such a scene (every one fleeing and carrying away whatever he deemed most precious), two brothers, in the height of their solicitude for the preservation of their wealth and goods, suddenly recollected that their father and mother, both very old, were unable to save themselves by flight. Filial tenderness triumphed over every other consideration. “Where,” cried the generous youths, “shall we find a more precious treasure than they are, who gave us being, and who have cherished and protected us through life?” Having said this, the one took up his father on his shoulders, and the other his mother, and happily made their way through the surrounding smoke and flames. All who were witnesses of this dutiful and affectionate conduct, were struck with the highest admiration; and they and their posterity ever after called the path which these young men took in their retreat, “The Field of the Pious.”

2. Among other excellent arguments for the immortality of the soul, there is one drawn from its perpetual progress toward perfection, without a possibility of ever arriving at it, which I do not remember to have seen opened and improved by others, who have written on this subject, though it seems to me to carry very great weight with it. How can it enter into the thoughts of a man, that the soul, which is capable of such immense perfections, and of receiving new improvements to all eternity, shall fall away into nothing, almost as soon as it is created 2 A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present. Were a human soul thus at a stand in her accomplishments; were her faculties to be full blown, and incapable of farther enlargement; I

EXERCISES.

which inhabit foreign regions, went to a neighbouring city to see an exhibition of wild beasts. “What is the name of that lovely animal,” said he to the keeper, “which you have placed near one of the ugliest beasts in your collection, as if you meant to contrast beauty with deformity o-" The animal which you admire,” re

plied the keeper, “is called a tiger; and, notwithstanding the

and 1n o description.

SECTION VI.
VARIETY OF STRUCTURE.

Vary the structure of the following sentences by changing the form of the clauses:—

EXAMPLE.

The boy, attentive to his studies, is sure to excel. The boy, who is attentive to his studies, is sure to excel. The boy being attentive to his studies, is sure to excel. The boy is sure to excel, as he is attentive to his studies. The boy is sure to excel, if he be attentive to his studies. By being attentive to his studies, the boy is sure to excel.

EXERCISES.

1. Shame being lost, all virtue is lost. 2. The king, who had never before committed an unjust action, dismissed his minister without inquiry. 3. He descended from his throne, and ascended the scaffold, and said, “Live, incomparable pair.” 4. She was deprived of all but her innocence, and lived in a retired cottage with her widowed mother, and was concealed more by her modesty than by solitude. 5. The dry leaves rustled on the ground, and the chilling winds whistled by me, and gave me a foretaste of the gloomy desolation of winter. 6. The trees were cultivated with much care, and the fruit was rich and abundant. 7. The lion and the eagle are both possessed of great strength, and exercise dominion over their fellows of the forest. Equally magnanimous, they disdain small plunder, and only pursue animals

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worthy of conquest. Solitary, they keep the desert to themselves alone: it is as extraordinary to see two pair of eagles in the same mountain, as two lions in the same forest. They keep separate to find a more ample supply, and consider the quantity of their game as the best proof of their dominion. Bred for war, they are the enemies of all society; alike fierce, proud, and incapable of being easily tamed.

SECTION VII.
VARIETY OF STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION.

Vary both the structure and the expression of the following sentences:—

EXAMPLE.

A wolf let into the sheepfold, will devour the sheep. A wolf being let into the sheepfold, the sheep will be devoured. If we let a wolf into the fold, the sheep will be devoured. The wolf will devour the sheep, if the sheepfold be left open. If the fold be not shut, the wolf will devour the sheep. Slaughter will be made amongst the sheep, if the wolf get into the fold.

EXERCISES.

1. Gentleness corrects whatever is offensive in our manners. 2. All mankind must taste the bitter cup, which destiny has mixed. 3. The places of those who refused to come, were soon filled with a multitude of delighted guests. 4. He who lives always in the bustle of the world, lives in a perpetual warfare. 5. The spirit of true religion breathes gentleness and affability. 6. You have pleaded your incessant occupation; exhibit the result of it. 7. Industry is not only the instrument of improvement, but the foundation of pleasure. 8. The advantages of this world, even when innocently gained, are uncertain blessings. 9. When you behold wicked men multiplying in number, and increasing in power, imagine not that Providence particularly favours them.

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