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THE

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No. I. of

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9. IN THE SEASON. By EDMUND YATES. With a full-page Illustration.

10. ENGLISH STABILITIES. By the REV. C. W. DENISON.

11. SECOND THOUGHTS. By F. C. BURNAND.

Preface or Introduction
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CONTENTS OF No. 1.

1. BRAKESPEARE; OR, THE FORTUNES OF A FREE LANCE. By the Author of "Guy Livingstone." With a full-page Illustration by J. A. PASQUIER. Chapters I. to V.

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LONDON, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1867.

CONTENTS.-No 294.

NOTES:-Shakespeariana: Runaway's Eyes: "Romeo and Juliet"-Curious Printing of the First Folio - Hamlet to Guildenstern-"Troilus and Cressida "-"As you like it," 121-"Chevy Chase," 123-Political Epigrams of last Century, 124-English Adherents of the House of Stuart, 125-Fata Morgana in the Japygian Peninsula-Notes on Fly-leaves-False Quantity in Byron's "Don Juan"Silver Font- Washington's Masonic Apron-Stuffing the Ears with Cotton-An old Don-Juanic Rhyme - Lines from a Canadian Paper-Holland: fine Linen, 126. QUERIES:- Unknown Object in Yaxley Church, Suffolk, 128-Portraits of Yorkshiremen, Ib.-Lord DarnleyDepledge-Ermine in Heraldry-Passage from Fortescue Earl of Home 'Frightened Isaac -Sir Godfrey Kneller-Passage in "Don Juan"- Permanent Colours -A Philosophic Brute-Poem concerning St. Sepulchre's, London - Qualifications for Voting Quiz Royal Christian Names - Samuel Smith, of Prettlewell, EssexScotish Peers: Eglinton Earldom Shenstone's Inn Verses-Vent - Wells in Churches, 129.

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Notes. SHAKSPEARIANA.

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS:- -The Fool in Pagan TimesSt. John of Beverley, 132.

REPLIES:- Pews or Seats, 133-Cap-a-pie, 135- Bishop Hay, 136 Debentures-"Oil of Mercy" "Thus! Earl St. Vincent - Duke of Moncada, Marquis D'Aytone -"Cut one's Stick"-Coat Cards or Court Cards-"Suppressed Poem of Lord Byron "- Perjury - Source of Quotations wanted-James Hamilton-"All is lost save Honour"-Shekel - Frederick Prince of Wales - Hanging in the Bell-ropes-Churches-Almack's Walking under a Ladder - Rule of the Road- Verna: Creole, &c. - Drinking Healths in New England, &c., 136.

Notes on Books, &c.

RUNAWAY'S EYES: "ROMEO AND JULIET " (Act III. Sc. 2). –

"That runaway's eyes may wink," &c., &c.

Is there room in "N. & Q." for yet one word on this thoroughly winnowed, but still "vexed" passage?

If we resolve on adopting a conjectural reading, I suppose opinions may fairly be divided between "rude day's," "rumour's," and "rumourers'." As for "unawares," I heartily agree with the critic who pronounced it "villainous," and should be much disposed to apply the same epithet to "renomy's." "Enemies" is neither very good nor very bad-certainly not satisfactory.

Let us make one more effort to expound the text as it stands. Warburton, who holds Phoebus to be meant, or Halpin, who stands up gallantly for Cupid, may possibly be right. Indeed it is impossible not to admit the great ingenuity of the argument for the last interpretation. But, even if I acquiesced in the conclusion, I should still dissent from the dictum of a critic in Blackwood, that "there could not be a happier-chosen and more expressive word than 'runaway's' as here employed."

How Steevens can satisfy himself that Night herself is the personage intended, I cannot under

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First. Why may not "runaway's eyes," or "runaway eyes," mean the eyes of those prying pests of society, whose business and pleasure it is to lie ever on the watch for any faux pas on the part of their neighbours, and, having seen one, to run away and spread the discovery through every "scandalous college" of which they are members? Does not Juliet simply mean: May the eyes of any watcher, lying perdu to run away with a report of our meeting, be made to wink-be blinded in spite of their malicious acuteness, by the darkness-and our interview consequently remain unseen and untalked of? "Untalked of" seems to me conclusive that Juliet was afraid of somebody who could "talk." So evidently thought the German translator, when he rendered the passage (one-volume Shakspere, Wien, 1826): —

"Verbreite deinen dichten Vorhang, Nacht,
Du Liebespflegerinn! damit das Auge
Der Neubegier sich schliess', und Romeo
Mir unbelauscht in diese Arme schlüppe!"

To me this interpretation is the simplest and most satisfactory: but secondly, to bring out this meaning more unmistakeably, is it not possible that the second word is the one misprinted-its first letter having also got accidentally tacked on to the preceding word; and that we ought, instead of "runaway's eyes," to read " runaway spies," or, with the alteration of only one letter, "runawaye spyes"? Everyone notoriously loves his own brain-children too much; but I must say, if we are to alter at all, this alteration appears to me to be as reasonable and small as any hitherto suggested by bigger men than I. But I am quite content to gather the same meaning, without any alteration whatever, from the words as they stand.

"Even the attempt," says MR. KEIGHTLEY, "to elucidate, if it be only a single word in our great dramatist, though mayhap a failure, is laudable;" and I therefore offer no apology for casting my small conjectural pebble on the huge cairn which commentators and critics have heaped over the bones of Shakspere.

In the copy of Romeo and Juliet, in the library of the Garrick Club-adapted to the stage by David Garrick, revised by J. P. Kemble, and published as it is acted at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden (1811), the reading is

"That the runaway's eyes may wink," &c. Is there any authority whatever for this?

H. K.

CURIOUS PRINTING OF THE FIRST FOLIO.-I am not aware if the circumstances of the position of Troilus and Cressida, in the volume of 1623 have been fully commented on by bibliographers and editors-1. It does not appear at all in the list of contents. 2. It is inserted, out of all order as to paging and signature, after Henry VIII. which ends the histories, and before Coriolanus, which should commence the tragedies.

It has remains of its own paging on the 2nd and 3rd pages only, being 79, 80 respectively; and, on what should be the 81st page, appears as a signature apparently the italic capital G, followed as an interpolated signature by p reversed, the usual mark used to indicate a paragraph in the authorised version. On examining further I find that it has evidently been displaced to make room for Timon of Athens. There is no signature i i, nor any pagination from 100 to 108 inclusive among the tragedies. Romeo and Juliet ends at p. 77, being part of signature gg; Julius Caesar begins at p. 109, being part of signature kk. Troilus and Cressida, if continuously paged, would begin at p. 78, being part of signature G italic, and end at p. 106. If we then allow a page and a blank for the prologue, we exactly fill the space required; whereas, Timon of Athens, the substitute, falls short by eight pages of the required quantity. From this it is quite evident that, as the volume was originally set up in type, Troilus and Cressida must have been "cast off" to follow Romeo and Juliet, and to precede Julius Cæsar.

It will be curious at this distance of time to speculate as to the causes of this alteration. There is one anomaly, however: allowance is made in this paging for the prologue to follow, not precede Troilus and Cressida; but it is not possible the whole play can have been shifted from its original position merely on account of a difficulty so easily remedied, and thus placed, as it were, in limbo between history and tragedy, as though the editors were in doubt with which division properly to locate it.

H.

HAMLET TO GUILDENSTERN (3rd S. xii. 3.)—

"I am but mad north-north west; when the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a hand-saw."

As your correspondent J. A. G. can find no explanation of this proverb, he offers a solution of

the difficulty by substituting anser, pronounced by the ignorant handser, and at last handsaw. I have always considered the word to be a corruption of hern-shaw; i. e. heronry. Heron was gradually contracted, in the speech of the vulgar, to hern, and at length crept into poetry. Gay writes:

"The tow'ring hawk, let future poets sing, Who terror bears upon his soaring wing; Let them on high the frighted hern survey, And lofty numbers paint their airy fray.'

The encounter between the hawk and the heron

was a favourite pastime in the middle ages for princes and nobles, and they watched the contest with strained gaze, as the one attacked and the other threw himself on his back to receive his too eager assailant on the long sharp beak, which frequently proved a fatal stratagem to the bird of prey. That Shakspeare was a dear lover from hackneyed version of his deer-stealing-say rather early youth of field sports we gather from the poaching-in Sir Thomas Lucy's domain, and his ridicule of that worthy squire for inflicting magisterial punishment on the culprit. And it is curious to note in this our day-three hundred years later—a similar result, how the offenders against the game laws have the press and playwrights as apologists for their transgressions. No doubt there was near the domain at Charlecote a heronry as well as a deer preserve, and our immortal bard may have incurred the penalty of the sixteenth century-twenty shillings for killing a heron, and ten shillings for robbing her nest. At any rate he was much more likely to put into Hamlet's mouth a proverb relating to the highlyprized sport of hawks and herons, than any allusion to a silly goose.

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