Josiah C. Wedgwood: The Man and His Work

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Lajpat Rai (Lala)
S. Ganesan, 1920 - India - 182 pages

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Page 102 - I would add that progress in this policy can only be achieved by successive stages. The British Government and the Government of India, on whom the responsibility lies for the welfare and advancement of the Indian peoples, must be judges of the time and measure of each advance...
Page 102 - The policy of His Majesty's Government, with which the Government of India are in complete accord, is that of the increasing association of Indians in every branch of the administration and the gradual development of self-governing institutions with a view to the progressive realisation of responsible government in India as an integral part of the British Empire.
Page 102 - The British Government and the Government of India, on whom the responsibility lies for the welfare and advancement of the Indian peoples, must be the judges of the time and measure of each advance, and they must be guided by the co-operation received from those upon whom new opportunities of service will thus be conferred and by the extent to which it is found that confidence can be reposed in their sense of responsibility.
Page 44 - My last recommendation is that we should no longer deny to Indians the full privilege of citizenship ; but should allow them a large share in the Government of their own country and in the control of that bureaucracy, which in this War, uncontrolled by public opinion, has failed to rise to British...
Page 29 - Lord Donoughmore, Lord Hugh Cecil, MP, Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge, General Sir Neville Lyttleton, Sir A.
Page 30 - September 26th, 1914, suggesting that a force should be sent from India to occupy Basra in the event of Turkey joining in the war. The advantages of such an expedition were stated by General Barrow to be that it would checkmate Turkish intrigues and demonstrate our ability to strike, it would encourage the Arabs to rally to us, it would safeguard Egypt, for without Arab support a Turkish invasion of Egypt was impossible, and it would effectually protect the oil installation at Abadan, in which the...
Page 35 - Turkey, supported by Germany, they ought immediately to have striven energetically to bring the equipment of the expedition up to the standard *of modern warfare. The Indian Government were guilty of omissions in nearly every branch of military provision, with the -exception of the commissariat, though even here the standard was low and the distribution of food uneven.

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