Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

8-8 WILLIAM-STREET.

INDEX.

A.

Editors' Table, 81, 168, 272, 371, 456, 545

Exploring Expedition,

84

Ambitious Man,

7 Early English Writers,

139

An Allegory. By Grace Grafton, 26 Executions in France,

287
American Girls. By Miss H. L. Eastern Lands,

312
BEASLEY,

27 English and American Steam Ves-
Atalantines. By John Galt, Esq., 63 sels,

422
ANTHON's Greek Grammar,

70
American Revolution. By J. R.

F.
TYSON, Esq.,

89, 217
A Psalm of Life. By Prof. H. W. 'Fifth Age of Shakspeare,

21
LONGFELLOW,

189 Fox Chase of England. By W. H.
American Poetry,
383 SOTHAM, Esq.,

133
Autumnal Stanzas,
432 Faith and Hope,

231
American Publishing House in Lon- Funeral of SHELLY,

242
don,
468 | Fieschi, execution of,

287
Apollo Gallery,
473 Friendship and Ingratitude,

308
A Thought,

537 Fading Tree. By Mrs. SIGOURNEY, 433
ANTHON'S "Prosody of the Greek Foreign Literature and other Gossip, 550
Language,

544
American Institute,

545

G.
American Writings Abroad,

549
Great Fête at Peterhoff,

98
B.
Geraldine.'

548

Brother Gray-frock and the Pilgrim, 132

H.

C.

Hymn. Landing of the Pilgrims, 20

Hope,

25

Climbing the Natural Bridge,

32 Hortus Siccus,

57

Crusades,

36 HALL's Notes on the Western States, 76

CATHERWOOD's Panoramas,

84 Hewitt's Poems,

79

Cooper's 'Homeward Bound,' 263 | Hans Swartz,

108

Conspiracy and Death of Fieschi, 287 Hymn of the Voyagers,

145

City of Rochester,

378 Huron Widow's Farewell,

216

Catacombs of Paris,

433 Hotel Dinner, -

227

City of Buffalo,

462 Hatteras. By W. G. Simms, Esq. 416

Chapter on Asses,

458 Hans Carvel,

426

Cooper's Review of LOCKHART'S Human Occupations,

433, 475

Life of Scott, -

471 Home as Found,'

539

Coxcombs. By J. H. BRIGHT, Esq., 538

I.

D.

Intermingled Leaves of Note Book

DEWEY's Discourses,
74 and Travel,

81, 168
Dental Hygeia,
84 I have no Wife,

112

Darkness,

97 Immortality,

405

Dick Easy's Bargain,

138 Ignorance of the Human System, 411

Defeat of Kerboga. By J. BARBER,

Esq.,

224

J.

Dying Girl,

255
DETOCQUEVILLE’s ‘Democracy in

Jealousy,

107
America,

256
Defence of Old Women,

309

K.

Dying Artist,

409

Kushow Property, -

190, 295

E.

L.

Evening of Life. By Hon. CHIEF
JUSTICE MELLEN,

28 Landing of the Pilgrims at New-

Energy,

54 Haven,

20

[graphic]

244956

Letters from Rome,

40

S.
Literary Notices, 70, 153, 256, 349, 449, 539
Literary Record, 85, 180, 285, 472, 551 Sketches of Young Ladies and Gen-
Love, Death, and Time,
127 tlemen,

80 Lay of the First Crusade, 224 Summer Morning,

103 Logger's Journey. By ROBERT "Sixth Age of Shakspeare,

113 GRANT, Esq.,

301 Sound Mind in a Sound Body, 149 Last Song, 324 Sayings of PERIANDER,

153 LOCKHART's Life of Scott, 349, 379 'Spekellation, or the Kushow ProLa Française,

399
perty,

190 Lament of the Cherokee,

436 Sonnet,

232, 292, 333 Lines to my Mother. By P. H.

'Seventh Age of Shakspeare,

232 Myers, Esq., 480 Stray Leaves,

237 Lines. By Lord EDWARD Fitz- Southern Picture. By W. GILMORE GERALD, 489 Simms, Esq.,

304 Love in a Lazzaret. By H. T. Sayings of Bias,

339 TUCKERMAN, Esq.,

494 SIGOURNEY's 'Letters to Mothers, 369 Lines to my Rocking-chair. Ву

Sub-Marine Armor,

373 Miss E. B. Lee, Charleston, 534 Sonnet. By George Lunt, Esq., 404

Sympathies,

400 M. Sunday in London,

481 Sayings of Solon,

533 Major Dart,

57 Marvellous Tale,

107

T. My Own Peculiar,

237, 502 Meeting and Parting, 251 Thoughts on Early Rising,

6 Memorial of JOHNNY MARSDEN, 325 To my Mother,

39 Ministerial Fête at Paris,

334 Ticknor's 'Medical Philosophy,' 80 Miser, a Sketch, 405 There is One God,'

223 Mayhew, the Indian Missionary, 507 Time,

236 The Sister's Wish,

237 N. “The Rose I gave her,'

309 The Fountain,

311 Night. By A. A. McNichol, Esq., 31 The Dying Archer,

317 Natural Bridge, 32 Thoughts on Hand Writing,

318 North American Review, 77, 461 Tears. By Chief Justice Mellen, 333 Nuns of the Priuli, 150 The Farewell,

421 National Defence,

181 Turnado in Western New-York. By Notes by a Retired Scholar, 305 Willis GAYLORD, Esq.,

489 The Pirate and the Dove,

494 0. The Last Song,

501 Thoughis. By ‘IONE,'

502 Osceola's Soliloquy. By P. H. My- The Leaf and the Worm. By EDERS, Esq., 55 WARD MATURIN, Esq.,

526 Old Age and Beauty, 146 The Religion of Nature,

527 Old Town Pump, 232 Two Desultory Chapters,

528 Ode to the Czar, 425 The 'Edinburgh Review,

547 Our Foreign Letter-File, 521 The late John W. GOULD,

547

[blocks in formation]

Reply to 'Oak by the Wayside,' 62 What is Wit?
Random Passages, 119, 242, 344, 416 Weindel's Gallery,
Revelation of Nature,

123 Wanderer's Return, Remarks on National Defence, 181 Winter Song, Recollections of Europe,

334, 433 WEBSTER's History of the U. States, Reverie. By Lieut. Burts,

340 William WORDSWORTH: Suneet, Richard Hurdis,

367 Reply to Cooper's Review of Scott, 503

Y.
Religion of Nature,
Rural Cemeteries,

534 | Youth,

35 85 391 521 543 546

527

520

[blocks in formation]

The history of Uranus, the most distant known planet of our solar system, in the various characters of fixed star, comet, and planet, which at different periods of time have been assigned to it, is no less remarkable than are some of the phenomena which, despite of its excessive elongation, observation has been able to detect in regard to it. Previous to that train of discoveries which terminated in adding this to the number of known bodies of our system, through a period so long that 'the traditions of man ran not to the contrary, Saturn was supposed to mark the utmost bound of that system. This was taken as an admitted fact, from the time that planetary distances first were measured ; and when the telescope had revealed the singular appendage of rings to that planet, these were supposed to yield some support to the opinion that this body had its orbit

upon

the confines of that region of space through which our sun could bear sway, by the power of its attraction. The wildest vagaries of nature, it was believed had been exhibited here, in arrangements altogether unknown elsewhere, for the purpose of more pointedly attracting the attention of mortals who should witness the fact, and thereby fixing the bounds beyond which they need not seek. Such, if not in words, are by apparently just inference, the views that have been more or less entertained, along with the other almost countless opinions to which credence has, in past times, been given. The indefinite distance, then, from the orbit of Saturn to the fixed stars, was regarded as a realm that, however extensive, could yield no harvest in reward for the labor which science might bestow within it, and therefore it was held unprofitable, in all respects.

The fixed stars which, so far as we know, were never supposed by any

of the human family, to belong to our solar system, were objects of the most anxious attention, in the earliest period of the bistory of

They constituted the calendar of primitive man; and served not only to indicate to him the several seasons, and other necessary divisions of the year, but they were also his time-keeper by night, as the sun was by day, and pointed out to him the lapse of hours, by their apparent motions in the heavens. This early discovery of the utility of the stars, in the common purposes of life, led to the division of them into groups or constellations, each of which received a name : and in addition to this, individual stars, that by their

1

[ocr errors]

our race,

VOL. XII.

« PreviousContinue »