A New Geographical, Historical, and Commercial Grammar: And Present State of the Several Kingdoms of the World, to which are Added, I. A Geographical Index, with the Names and Places Alphabetically Arranged. II. A Table of the Coins of All Nations, and Their Value in English Money. III. A Chronological Table of Remarkable Events, from the Creation to the Present Time

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G. G. and J. Robinson and J. Mawman, 1801 - Geography - 1056 pages
 

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Page 336 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birthright, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it — for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our fore-fathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.
Page 47 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 749 - of seven square enclosures, one within the other, the walls of which are 25 feet high, and 4 thick. These enclosures are 350 feet distant from one another, and each has four large gates, with a high tower, which are placed one in the middle of each side of the enclosure, and opposite to the four cardinal points. The outward wall is nearly four miles in circumference...
Page 251 - All mischiefs and grievances, operations and remedies, that transcend the ordinary course of the laws, are within the reach of this extraordinary tribunal.
Page 253 - This petition (when founded on facts that may be in their nature disputed) is referred to a committee of members, who examine the matter alleged, and accordingly report it to the house ; and then (or otherwise, upon the mere petition) leave is given to bring in the bill. In public matters the bill is brought in upon motion made to the house, without any petition at all. Formerly, all bills were drawn in the form of petitions...
Page 251 - It hath sovereign and uncontrollable authority in the making, confirming, enlarging, restraining, abrogating, repealing, reviving, and expounding of laws, concerning matters of all possible denominations, ecclesiastical or temporal, civil, military, maritime, or criminal: this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is entrusted by the constitution of these kingdoms.
Page 248 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by the law? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen: All this I promise to do.
Page 247 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people — and, by the advice of Jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom — has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 144 - ... in order to form it; between the angles of which a yellow stalagmitic matter has exuded, which serves to define the angles precisely, and at the same time vary the colour with a great deal of elegance, and to render it still more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without...
Page 250 - ... to be precarious. The nobility, therefore, are the pillars, which are reared from among the people, more immediately to support the throne; and, if that falls, they must also be buried under its ruins.

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