The Free-thinker, Volume 2

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A collection of essays by Dr. Boulter, Richard West, Dr. Gilbert Burnet, Henry Stephens, and Ambrose Philips.
 

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Page 107 - Tis not to make me jealous To say my wife is fair, feeds well, loves company, Is free of speech, sings, plays, and dances well; Where virtue is, these are more virtuous: Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw The smallest fear, or doubt of her revolt; For she had eyes, and chose me.
Page 202 - Wings were not difco-nable under his Habit : And when he had a mind to •fly, he needed only to touch them with his Hand, and they would fpread fo as to bear him through the Air, fwifter than an Eagle. When he had no farther occafion for his Wings, with a Touch they (hrunk again to fo fmaH a Size, as to lie concealed under his Garment.
Page 178 - Florella, before flie was put to Death. The old Woman, imagining her to be One of the Ladies of the Court...
Page 258 - Then (continued the Fairy) it will be necessary to make an exchange, and to transfer your age and infirmities to some one who will be contented to spare you her youth and health. To whom, therefore, shall we give your hundred years...
Page 259 - Reign over the One Half; and I will content my felf with the Other : This will be Power enough in Confcience for you, who are but a little mean Peafant. No, replies...
Page 174 - The Country, flocking from day to day to obtain a Sight of her, made her, yet, more fenfible of her Beauty.
Page 172 - Gangen, pauci dignoscere possunt Vera bona atque illis multum diversa, remota Erroris nebula. Quid enim ratione timemus Aut cupimus ? quid tam dextro pede concipis, ut te Conatus non...
Page 180 - Village; where fhe tended Sheep. She frequently heard People relate, and lament over, her Adventures : Songs were made upon them ; which drew Tears from all Eyes : She often took a...
Page 303 - Satisfaction to a candid Temper, to be employed in revealing the latent Merit of any Man : And, I am forry, that I have not frequent Opportunities of indulging my Heart in this Pleafure. This makes me lay hold on the firft Occafion of this Kind, with Impatience; efpecially, fince I hope to pleafe all the Lovers of Poetry, at the fame Time that I gratify my felf. From this Motive, I take the Liberty to mention Mr.
Page 260 - When the Two Parties feemed now difpofed to an Agreement, and were ready to ftrike the Bargain, in comes the Fairy ; and, addreflmg her fclf to Mopfy, faid : Are you willing to make Trial of the Condition of an Old Queen ; and fee firft how you like it, before you refolve upon the Change, in good Earneft ? With all my Heart ; replies the Girl. Her Forehead is, inftantly, furrowed with Wrinkles ; her chefnut Hair turns...

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