Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 6, 2006 - History - 495 pages
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Covering European history from the invention of the printing press to the French Revolution, this accessible and engaging textbook offers an innovative account of people's lives, from a variety of backgrounds, in the early modern period and within the global context of European developments. Six central topics - individuals in society, politics and power, cultural and intellectual life, religion, economics and technology - are explored in two chronological sections, 1450-1600 and 1600-1789. The text takes in Europe in its entirety, eastward to the Ottoman Empire, northward to Sweden, and southward to Portugal, includes European colonies overseas, and integrates religious, ethnic, gender, class, and regional differences. Students are encouraged to think about continuities as well as changes across this formative period and throughout the text, maps, illustrations, timelines, and textboxes of original sources and featured topics illuminate the narrative. Online resources include primary source material, music examples and regularly updated bibliographies.

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This book is seriously deficient in its presentations and misrepresents developments in Europe. She glaringly under-discusses the clash between Catholic Europeans and the Ottoman Turks throughout the critical 16th Century; misrepresenting the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg dynasty, the Iberian expansion and the mapping of the globe. Her chronologies are misleading and incomplete, and she fails to provide a comprehensive time-line. There is no appendix listing the political powers of the critical political jurisdictions throughout the period. 1450 is an arbitrarily selected date not tied to any of the dominant themes of Europe, including the European Expansion, the Renaissance, the European Clash with the Ottomans, the Catholic World after Trent, the development of Fire Arms and gun powder. The text is a regurgitation of present-day Academic PC dogma, a large portion of which seeks to impose marginal concerns of the late 20th-21st century on the realities of the 15th-17th Centuries. In summary, it would be kind to be able to say that this is a text that consciously distorts history for modern-day political purposes, but in fact the deficiencies of this text are more likely to be a product of an author that is both uninformed and unwilling to look past her own limitations and biases.  

Contents

Individuals in society 14501600
44
Politics and power 14501600
78
Cultural and intellectual life 14501600
116
Religious reform and consolidation 14501600
151
Economics and technology 14501600
184
Europe in the world 14501600
219
Individuals in society 16001789
252
Politics and power 16001789
284
Cultural and intellectual life 16001789
326
Religious consolidation and renewal 16001789
367
Economics and technology 16001789
402
Europe in the world 16001789
438
Index
484
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About the author (2006)

Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an experienced textbook author. Her recent books include Discovering the Ancient Past (2004), Gender in History (2001) and the second edition of Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe (2000).

Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an experienced textbook author. Her recent books include Discovering the Ancient Past (2004), Gender in History (2001) and the second edition of Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe (2000).

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