Readings in the History of Education: A Collection of Sources and Readings to Illustrate the Development of Educational Practice, Theory, and Organization

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1920 - Education - 684 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Athens in the Time of Pericles
12
The Instruction of the Sophists
13
An Example of Socrates Teaching
15
The Schools of Alexandria
18
What we owe to the Greeks
20
THE EDUCATION AND WORK OF ROME Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
23
The Laws of the Twelve Tables
24
Importance of the Twelve Tables in Education
25
A Roman Farmers Calendar
26
The Grave and Severe Character of the Life of the Earlier Roman
27
The Old Roman Education described
28
The Old and the New Education contrasted
30
Attempts to prohibit the Introduction of Greek Higher Learning at Rome a Decree of the Roman Senate 161 B C
33
Difficulty in learning to read illustrated by a Page from
34
The Education given by a Father
36
6 To a Schoolmaster
37
On Oratory
38
Privileges granted to Physicians and Teachers
39
THE RISE AND CONTRIBUTION OF CHRISTIANITY
40
New PEOPLES IN THE EMPIRE
64
EDUCATION DURING THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES
75
The Copying of Books at a Monastery
77
Anathemas to protect Books from Theft
83
General Proclamations as to Education
89
67
96
INFLUENCES TENDING TOWARD A REVIVAL OF LEARN
127
THE RISE OF THE UNIVERSITIES
152
III
170
Value and Influence of the MediŠval University
182
EDUCATIONAL RESULTS OF THE REVIVAL OF LEARNING
203
THE REVOLT AGAINST AUTHORITY Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
226
On the Enemies of Christ
227
Attack the Pope and the Practice of Indulgences
228
List of Church Abuses demanding Re form
230
Illustrations from his NinetyFive Theses
231
On the Treatment of Heresy
233
The English Act of Supremacy
235
EDUCATIONAL RESULTS OF THE PROTESTANT RE VOLTS I LUTHERANS AND ANGLICANS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
236
Diffusion of Education in MediŠval Times
237
Vernacular Style of the Translations of the Bible
239
Letter to the Mayors and Magistrates of Germany
241
On the Dignity and Importance of the Teachers Work
243
On the Duty of compelling School Attendance
244
An Example of a Lutheran Kirchenordnung
245
Saxony Plan of 1528
247
School System established in WŘrtemberg
249
The Schulemethode of SaxeCoburgGotha
251
The Careful Supervision of the Teachers Acts and Religious Beliefs in England a Letter of Queens Council on
255
Penalties on NonConforming Schoolmasters
256
Oath of a GrammarSchool Master
259
Grammar School Statutes regarding Prayers
260
Effect of the Translation of the Bible into English
261
Ignorance of the Monks at Canterbury and Mes senden
263
Origin of the English Poor Law of 1601
267
The PoorRelief and Apprenticeship Law of 1601
268
EDUCATIONAL RESULTS OF THE PROTESTANT REVOLTS II CALVINISTS AND CATHOLICS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
272
Scheme of Christian Education adopted
273
Kilpatri Pork of the Dutch in developing Schools
276
Kilpatti iaracter of the Dutch Schools of 1650
279
EDUCATIONAL RESULTS OF THE PROTESTANT REVOLT
285
THE RISE OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY
316
THE NEW SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND THE SCHOOLS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
328
On the Nature of Education
330
Statement of the Aim and Purpose of Education
331
His Program for Study
332
Discontent of the Nobility with the Schools
335
Ridicule of the Humanistic Pedants
336
His Conception of Education
337
Extracts from his Thoughts on Education
339
Plan for WorkingSchools for Poor Children
343
THEORY AND PRACTICE BY THE MIDDLE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
360
On the Teaching of Latin
364
Two Early Spelling Books
365
Description of PreRevolutionary Schools
368
Teachers in Gotha in 1741
369
An EighteenthCentury Swedish Peoples School
370
Schools of FrankfurtamMain in Eighteenth Cen tury
371
A Swiss Teachers Examination in 1793
372
The English DameSchool de scribed
374
A ParochialSchool Teachers Agreement
377
CharitySchool Organization and Instruction a Qualifications for the Master
379
a Books proper to be used in CharitySchools
381
6 Lewiss Exposition of the Christian Catechism
382
A CharitySchool Subscription Form
383
The CharitySchool of Saint Johns Parish
384
An EighteenthCentury Indenture of Apprentice ship
385
THE EIGHTEENTH A TRANSITION CENTURY
392
THE BEGINNINGS OF NATIONAL EDUCATION
408
New THEORY AND SUBJECTMATTER FOR THE ELE
429
Explanation of his Work
439
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION IN FRANCE
490
THE STRUGGLE FOR NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
508
675
532
AWAKENING AN EDUCATIONAL CONSCIOUSNESS IN THE UNITED STATES Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
542
The Schools of Boston about 17901815
543
Petition for Free Schools 1799
546
Rules and Regulations for the Schools in 1820
548
A Memorial for Better Schools 1837
549
Beginnings of Public Education in New York City
551
Advantages of the Monitorial System
553
Establishment of Primary Schools in Boston
554
The ElementarySchool System in 1823
555
Report of WorkingMens Committee on Schools
558
THE AMERICAN BATTLE FOR FREE STATE SCHOOLS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
561
The Ground of the FreeSchool System
562
Repeal of the Connecticut School Law
565
On the Repeal of the Connecticut School Law
567
cut
568
The Struggle for Free Schools in Norwich Connecti 320 Address The State and Education
570
A RateBill and a Warrant for Collection
573
On Religious Instruction in the Schools
575
Petition for a Division of the School Funds
576
CounterPetition against Division
578
Act of Incorporation of Norwich Free Academy
579
Establishment of the First American High School
580
The SecondarySchool System in 1823
583
The HighSchool Law of 1827
585
An Example of the Opposition to High Schools
586
The Kalamazoo Decision
587
Program of Studies at the University 184344
589
The Michigan State System of Public Instruction
591
EDUCATION BECOMES A NATIONAL TOOL Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
593
Constitutional Provisions as to Education and Religious Freedom
594
The Basic Documents of Japanese Education a Preamble to the Education Code of 1872
595
c Instructions as to Lessons on Morals
596
The Transformation of China by Education
597
The Recent Progress of Science
600
Scientific Knowledge must precede Invention
603
Lack of Intercommunication illustrated
604
New CONCEPTIONS OF THE EDUCATIONAL PRO
617
Beginnings of Teacher Training in England
623
Importance of the Normal School
630
Grading the Schools
636
Herbart and Modern Psychology
644
MidNineteenth Century Elementary Education
651
Conclusions as to the Importance of Science
659
New TENDENCIES AND EXPANSIONS
667
English Conditions before the First
679
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 331 - The end, then, of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection.
Page 312 - HUSH ! my dear, lie still and slumber, Holy angels guard thy bed ! Heavenly blessings without number Gently falling on thy head. Sleep, my babe, thy food and raiment, House and home, thy friends provide ; All without thy care or payment, All thy wants are well supplied. How much better thou'rt attended Than the Son of God could be ; When from heaven he descended...
Page 92 - Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; Blow upon my garden, That the spices thereof may flow out. Let my beloved come into his garden, And eat his pleasant fruits.
Page 534 - It shall not be required as a condition of any child being admitted into or continuing in the school, that he shall attend or abstain from attending any Sunday school, or any place of religious worship, or that he shall attend any religious observance or any instruction in religious subjects in the school or elsewhere...
Page 596 - ... extend your benevolence to all; pursue learning and cultivate arts, and thereby develop intellectual faculties and perfect moral powers; furthermore, advance public good, and promote common interests; always respect the Constitution and observe the laws; should emergency arise, offer yourselves courageously to the State; and thus guard and maintain the prosperity of Our Imperial Throne coeval with heaven and earth.
Page 425 - It shall be the duty of the General Assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation from township schools to a State University, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 43 - ROMANS p)AUL, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, (which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures,) concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh, and declared to be the Son of .God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead...
Page 422 - ... convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters, paid by the public, as may enable them to instruct at low prices...
Page 263 - In the name of God amen. The 1 st day of September in the 36th year of the reign of our sovereign lord Henry VIII by the grace of God King of England, France and Ireland, defender of the faith and of the church of England and also of Ireland, in earth the supreme head, and in the year of our Lord God 1544.
Page 402 - ... of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty ; nor can he be compelled to give evidence against himself; that no man be deprived of his liberty except by the law of the land, or the judgment of his peers.

Bibliographic information