Screenwriting is Storytelling: Creating an A-List Screenplay that Sells!

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Penguin, Oct 5, 2004 - Performing Arts - 288 pages
While most screenwriting books focus on format and structure, Kate Wright explains how to put story at the center of a screenplay. A compelling story, complete with intriguing characters and situations created with these screenwriting tricks of the trade can become a box office blockbuster film.

Screenwriters will learn:

- Developing themes within the plot
- Using structure to define the story
- Creating memorable characters
- Establishing moral dilemmas and conflicts
- Achieving classic elements of storytelling in a three-act dramatic structure
- Mastering different genres
 

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Contents

BECOMING A STORYTELLER
WHAT IS STORY?
STORYTELLERS VS SCREENWRITERS
OTHER STORY FORMS
WHAT STORYTELLERS KNOW ABOUT STORYTELLING
WHY DO PEOPLE GO TO MOVIES?
WHAT MOVIES DO PEOPLE WANT TO SEE?
AMERICAN HEROES AND UNIVERSAL VALUES
THE MAIN CHARACTER OR PROTAGONIST
THE ANTAGONIST
THE CATALYST OR STORY AGENT
STRATEGIES FOR CREATING ORIGINAL SUPPORTING CHARACTERS
THE BASIC TASK
THE STEPS OF THE PROCESS
THESIS +ANTITHESIS SYNTHESIS MORAL OF THE STORY
MORAL VS ETHICAL

OTHER TOP MOVIES EVER WORLDWIDE
SPIRITUAL THEMES THAT BREAK THE BOX OFFICE
FALLEN HEROES AND DARK THEMES
BIOGRAPHICAL EPIC
FOREIGN FILMS
MOVIES WITH A VOICE
WHAT VALUES AM I ATTRACTED TO?
IS IT ORIGINAL?
IS IT A MOVIE POSTER?
IS IT COMPELLING?
IS IT A MOVIE?
WHAT IS THE STORY?
WHAT IS THE KEY TO THE STORY?
FROM WHOSE POINT OF VIEW IS THE STORY TOLD?
THE BASIC 3ACT PARADIGM
STORY PROGRESSION
CREATING 12 SEQUENCES WITHIN 3ACT STRUCTURE
IDEAS BEHIND THE STORY
ESTABLISH THEME TO CREATE SPINE
IDEAS AS CHARACTERS
SIX STAGES OF STORYTELLING
THE EIGHT CREATIVE AVENUES INTO STORYTELLING
LEFT BRAINRIGHT BRAIN
GENRES AND SUBGENRES
IMITATING GENRE VS IMITATING MOVIES
MIXING GENRES
PLOT
STORY
THE HUMAN CONDITION
THE ABCs OF SUBPLOTS AND STORY
CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT
ANTAGONISTS AND SUPPORTING CHARACTERS
OPPOSING VALUES AND GOALS
GREAT ANTAGONISTS
VILLAINS AND VILLAINESSES
THE WEIGHT OF THE ANTAGONIST
CREATING A MORAL DILEMMA
THE MORAL OF THE STORY
WEAK MORAL DILEMMAS
ESTABLISHING MOTIVATION MORAL DILEMMA PERSONAL STORY
MAIN CHARACTERS KEY DRAMATIC DECISION
SECOND MAJOR SCENE BETWEEN THE MAIN CHARACTER AND ANTAGONIST
RESURRECTING AND DEFEATING THE MAIN CHARACTER
THE FOURPARAGRAPH ONEPAGE STRUCTURE
STORY LOGIC AND EMOTIONAL IDEAS
STORY BEATS VS SCENES
INSIDE THE REAL STORY
BUILDING TOWARD A CLIMAX
THE PROFESSIONAL OUTLINE
PREPARING THE SCENE
CHARACTERS AS IDEAS
STAGING
CREATING A CLIMAX
CREATING A STORY PIVOT AND TRANSITION
SCENE WRITERS BEWARE
YOUR UNIQUE VOICE
THE ALIST DECISION
THE VISUAL ART FORM
COMMON STORY MISTAKES
STORYTELLING TRAPS
LAND MINES WHERE THE STORY IMPLODES
TECHNICAL CONFUSION
REWRITING
THREE STEPS OF REWRITING
SCRIPT DOCTORING
TOP TWENTY SCREENWRITING COMPETITIONS
NICHE AND REGIONAL SCREENWRITING COMPETITIONS
RECOMMENDED SOURCES
BOOKS
ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Kate Wright is an Emmy Award-winning producer and screenwriter with more than 20 years of experience. Ms. Wright is a Senior Instructor at UCLA Extension's internationally known Writers Program where she teaches "Script Doctoring: Rewriting for Production" and "Writing the Screenplay the Professional Way."

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