History of Europe from the Commencement of the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1815, Volume 6

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Contents

Napoleons reply to Truguet
9
A coupdétat is resolved on against the Jacobins
10
Napoleons reason for transporting the Jacobins though innocent
11
It is afterwards discovered that the Chouans were the really guilty parties
12
Napoleon creates the Duke of Parma King of Etruria
13
Parallel published by authority between Cæsar Cromwell and Napoleon
14
Debate on the lists of eligibility in the council of state
15
Admirable views of Napoleon on the subject
16
Decision on it by the legislature
17
Legion of Honour Napoleons arguments in favour of it in the council of state ib 19 Military supremacy secured by civil qualifications
18
His argument for the extension of the honour to civilians
19
Arguments against the institution by Thibaudeau
20
Alleged tendency of the institution to originate a patrician class
21
And its tendency toward the reestablishment of a monarchy ib 24 Napoleons reply
22
Existence of honorary rewards in the ancient republics and necessity of them to the formation of the soldier
23
Necessity of such institutions to the maintenance of the Republic ib 27 Small majority by which it is adopted by the legislature
25
State of religion in France at this period
27
It entirely succeeded
28
Napoleon is created First Consul for ten years additional Grounds set forth in the senatusconsultum on the occasion
29
Napoleons reply
30
Concordat July 15 1801 passed into a law April 8 1802
32
VOL VI
33
General dissatisfaction which it occasioned 36 Ceremony on the occasion in Notre Dame
35
Splendid pageant on the field of Marengo
37
Prudence of Napoleon in restraining the highchurch party ib 39 His admirable proclamation on the subject of the concordat to the people of France
38
Subsequent opinions of Napoleon on the subject
39
Napoleons views for the restoration of the property of the emigrants
40
Senatusconsultum proclaiming a general amnesty
41
Inadequacy of these measures to heal the evils of revolutionary confisca tion
42
Immense extent of this evil and its irremediable effects
43
Napoleons important observations on this subject
44
Ruinous effects of this violence
45
Measures to promote public instruction
46
Napoleons measures in favour of education
47
Principles on which his system was founded and rewards to sciences
48
Trials of public feeling by the royalists
49
Measures for recruiting the army and navy Debates on the subject in the council of state ib Discussion on the Ecole Militaire note
51
Their right to representation in the parent state
52
Superior justice of colonial administration in monarchical than in repub lican states
53
Finances of France General valuation or cadastre
54
Immense evils arising from its inequality
55
Napoleons arguments on the necessity of a cadastre
56
His system to remedy the evils
57
Indignation of Napoleon at the language used in the tribunate
58
Important change in municipal government carried in spite of that body
59
Debates on the tribunate in the council of state
60
Napoleons plan for modifying it
61
He resolves to make himself consul for life His efforts to spread monarchical ideas
63
Strong opposition of Josephine to these attempts
64
The attempt at first fails in the senate
65
Means adopted to insure its success
66
Reference of the question to the votes of the people ib 70 Result of the appeal and great satisfaction which this gave
67
Letter of Lafayette declining to vote for it
68
Answer of the First Consul to the address of the senate on the occasion
69
Napoleons ideas on the lists of eligibility
70
The usages of the English representative system inapplicable to France
71
Great changes in the constitution
72
Acceptance of the new constitution by the senate
73
Aspect of Paris and its society at this period ib Generous conduct of Mr Fox in defending Mr Pitt to the First Consul note
74
Formation of the lower gallery in the Louvre
75
Great satisfaction which these changes gave in foreign courts ib
76
Suppression of the ministry of police
77
And dismissal of Fouché
78
Changes in the constitution of the senate
80
Renewed correspondence between Louis XVIII and Napoleon ib 86 Formation of the Code Napoleon
82
Extreme difficulty of legal reformation
83
Discussions on the subject of the Code in the council of state
84
Great ability of Napoleon in these discussions
85
Law of succession as finally fixed by Napoleon
86
Sketch of the French revolutionary system of succession ib 93 Prodigious effects of this law in subdividing land in France
88
Singular attachment of the modern French to this law
90
Which is fatal to all real freedom ib 96 Law regarding divorce
91
Great effects of the salutary changes introduced by Napoleon
92
Extreme difficulty of the task he had undertaken
93
Great public works set on foot in France
94
Vast improvements in Paris
95
CHAPTER XXXVI
97
the St Domingo revolt to the French navy
98
Its statistical details
100
Origin of the revolution in that island Rash measures of the French Constituent Assembly
101
Freedom is conferred on all persons of colour
102
The insurrection breaks out
103
Page 9 Furious civil war in the south of the island
104
The Constituent Assembly in vain try to retrace their steps
105
The French delegates in vain endeavour to settle differences
106
The insurrection becomes universal ib 13 The Girondists resolve upon unlimited concession
107
The arrival of the commissioners augments the discord
108
Storming and massacre of Cape Town
109
The universal freedom of the blacks is proclaimed
110
The English obtain a footing on the island but are soon expelled
111
Napoleon confirms Toussaint in his command
112
Vigorous measures of the negro chief in the administration ib 21 His agricultural policy He is appointed president for life of the island
113
Napoleon instantly resolves to subdue the island
114
Increasing prosperity of the island under Toussaints administration ib 24 Preparations of Napoleon for its subjugation
116
Immense naval and military forces assembled
117
The British government makes no opposition ib 27 The expedition sails and arrives off St Domingo
118
First irresolution but final firmness of Toussaint
119
The French land and Cape Town is burnt by the blacks ib 30 But the French generally prevail in the field
120
Description of the mountainous interior to which the negroes retire
121
Fruitless attempt to induce Toussaint to submit
122
General and successful attack on his position
123
Desperate defence at CrêteàPierrot
124
The war assumes a guerilla character
125
Negotiations for the termination of hostilities Dignified conduct of Tous saint
126
General pacification
127
Treacherous views of Napoleon
128
Perfidious arrest of Toussaint by the French authorities ib 40 Subsequent treatment and death of Toussaint
129
Dreadful atrocities on both sides in Guadaloupe
130
General revolt in St Domingo Death of Le Clerc
131
Continued successes of the negroes
132
The rupture of the peace of Amiens causes the total destruction of the French
133
Reflections on the expedition ib 46 Degraded state of St Domingo ever since that time
135
Inferiority of the negro to the European
136
Ambitious designs of Napoleon in Europe
137
Holland is again revolutionised ib 50 And the Cisalpine republic again remodelled
139
Entry of Napoleon into Lyons Senatusconsultum there settling the Cisalpine government
140
Nature of the new constitution
142
Annexation of Piedmont to France ib 54 Construction of the road over Mont Cenis and the Simplon
143
Parma and Placentia are occupied with Elba
144
Progress of the negotiation regarding the German indemnities
145
Cordial union of France and Prussia in this matter
146
In return for which Prussia guarantees the French acquisitions in Italy
147
Policy of Austria in this negotiation and of Russia
148
Secret views of the latter power
149
Courageous act of Austria in occupying Passau ib 62 Angry correspondence in consequence between France and Austria
150
Conferences at Ratisbon
151
Proportion in which the several powers gained acquisitions note
152
It destroyed all ideas of public right or international law
154
Projects of Napoleon against Switzerland federal system in that country
155
Necessity of it in all extensive democratic states
156
Its adaptation to the varieties of the physical condition of Switzerland it 71 Discontent which the central democratic government produced
157
Violent internal dissensions of the Swiss Cantons
158
Revolution effected by the aid of the French troops
161
But it does not answer the views of Napoleon
162
The government is again deposed and a new constitution framed by Napoleon
163
The French troops are withdrawn and the independence of the Valais is proclaimed
164
Upon which the government at Berne is overturned and the mountaineers prepare for war
165
Hostilities commence Great early success of the mountaineers
166
Diet assembled at Schwytz and total subversion of the central government
167
Forcible interference of the First Consul
168
The Swiss in vain invoke the aid of Austria England remonstrates in vain
170
The Swiss in despair submit and Ney overruns the country
171
Speech of the First Consul to the Swiss deputies at Paris
172
His statement of the proposed constitution
173
Discontent which his principles excite on both sides
174
His final Act of Mediation for the settlement of Helvetia
175
Equitable measures for the government of the country
176
Estreme dissatisfaction excited by this event over Europe
177
Opinion of Mr Fox on the subject and on the treatment of Holland note
179
Rapid improvement of the finances and trade of the country
180
Financial details
181
Causes of irritation which gradually arose with France
183
Complaints and demands of the First Consul
184
Answer of the British government
185
Trial of Peltier for a libel on the First Consul
186
Expedition of Sebastiani to Egypt
187
Violent explosion of Napoleon in conversation with Lord Whitworth
189
Danger to him from war and his assertion of desire to conciliate
190
And of the inveterate hostility of England
191
Hostile preparations on both sides Unanimity in England in support of the government
192
Second violent ebullition of Napoleon to Lord Whitworth
193
Diplomatic military preparations of France
194
Note in reply to Napoleons complaints from Lord Hawkesbury
196
Ultimatum of both parties War is at length declared
197
Arrest of all the British travellers in France
198
General indignation which it excited even in France note
200
Defence of the retention of Malta
201
The aggressions of France on the Continent as a ground for war
202
And Napoleons measures specially directed against England
203
Results of noninterference during the peace
204
Arguments on the other side by the Opposition
205
Their defence of the German spoliations c
206
Reprobate the demands of Napoleon relative to the emigrants
207
And the sending of French commissioners to England
208
Reflections on the altered tone of the Opposition
209
England was obviously resolved on war
210
But it was unavoidable on Napoleons acknowledged intention ib 120 Napoleons own account of his designs against England at this period
211
121 The greatest stretches of power by France during his reign were made in time of peace
213
And vast growth during peace of her military power
214
His constant severity to his most friendly and submissive allies as exempli fied in the cases of Holland Sardinia and Spain
215
And in those of Portugal the Pope Venice c
216
His lenity to the great powers which resisted him
217
All which was a prelude to his grand final attack on England
218
CHAPTER XXXVII
219
Conquest of Hanover by the French
220
A convention is agreed to by the Hanoverian generals
221
Violation of neutral rights by the French generals
222
They extend themselves through southern Italy
223
Declarations against English commerce
224
Immense preparations on the shores of the Channel for the invasion of Britain ib 8 Object of these preparations Works at Boulogne
226
And in the other harbours in the Channel
227
Napoleon visits Antwerp and orders immense works there
229
His design for the invasion
230
And measures to enforce discipline in the army on the coast
231
Humiliating treaties agreed to by Switzerland Spain and Portugal
232
Louisiana sold to America and Piedmont annexed to France Vast force collected on the coast by the money thus gained
233
Military force and finances of France
234
Preparations of England to repel the danger
235
Numbers and warlike spirit of the volunteers
237
Naval preparations
238
Finances and new taxes of the year
239
Mr Pitts speech on fortifying London ib 22 Reflections on this measure
240
Napoleons opinion on the subject note
241
Murder of the Lord ChiefJustice in Dublin
242
Execution of the ringleaders
243
Naval events of the year
244
Defeat of Linois by the China fleet
245
Supplies and finances for 1804
246
General despondency which ensued in Britain
247
Which is increased by the alarming illness of the King
248
All eyes are turned to Mr Pitt and coalition against the ministry
249
Mr Pitt becomes Prime Minister
251
Vigorous measures of Lord Melville for the restoration of the navy
252
And admirable civil regulations for that service
253
Alexanders difference with France
254
Which leads to the recall of the Russian ambassador from Paris
255
Napoleon gains over Prussia by hinting at its getting Hanover
256
Immense sensation excited by the execution of the Duc dEnghien
257
The French governinent attempts a setoff by falsifying Mr Drakes pro ceedings at Stuttgard
258
Opinions of the diplomatic body at Paris on the subject
260
Note of Lord Hawkesbury on the subject and answer of Talleyrand note
261
Talleyrands answer
264
Further memorial of Russia
265
Pacific system of Austria
266
Its conduct on the death of the Duc dEnghien and the affair of Drake and Spencer Smith
267
Recognises Napoleons imperial title
268
Temporising policy of Prussia
269
The accession of Hardenberg to power produces no external change
270
They remonstrate against the seizure of Sir George Rumboldt
271
Hostile dispositions of Sweden
273
Which is taken advantage of by Great Britain
274
Extension of French power in Italy
275
Internal measures of Napoleon
276
Splendid fête at Boulogne ib 55 His vexation at the dispersion of his flotilla in the midst of it
278
Disgraceful adulation with which he was surrounded
281
Vast designs of the emperor at Mayence for the Confederation of the Rhine
282
Origin of the differences between England and Spain
283
Secret measures of hostility by the latter power
285
Catastrophe which precipitated hostilities
287
Which at once brings on a war
288
Arguments in parliament against the conduct of government
289
On its conduct with regard to the treasureships
291
Defence of the government by Mr Pitt
292
On the successive provocations given by the Spanish government
293
Defence of the capture of the frigates
294
The government is supported by parliament
295
Reflections on the subject ib 71 And particulars in which England appears to have been wrong
296
CHAPTER XXXVIII
298
Discontent of the republican officers of the army
299
Pichegru in London and royalist movements in France
300
Project of Fouché for getting up a conspiracy of republicans and royalists
301
Fouché reveals the plot to Napoleon and is restored to power Arrest of the conspirators
304
Consternation which the announcement of the plot excites in Paris
305
Arrest of Pichegru
307
History and character of the Duc dEnghien
308
leon note 309 11 His arrest is unjustly resolved on by Napoleon and the council of state
309
Occupation of the prince at that time
311
He is seized and conducted to Strassburg Vain intercession of Josephine
312
He had been vainly warned of his danger and is removed to Vincennes ib 15 Where he is delivered over to a military commission by Napoleons orde...
314
Gross iniquity committed towards him
315
Opinion which Napoleon entertained of him
324
Death of Pichegru ib 28 The surgeons report on his death and presumptions against Napoleon
326
Reflections on the probable privity of the First Consul to his death ib 30 Confirmation of the probability of his assassination from his previous expres...
327
Napoleons defence of himself on this subject at St Helena note
328
Trial of Moreau Georges and others
329
Amount of the admission on which Moreau was condemned
330
Intense interest excited at Paris
332
Heroic indifference of Georges and condemnation of the prisoners
333
Public feeling on this subject ib 37 Clemency of the First Consul after the convictions were obtained
334
His intended lenity to Moreau
335
His opinion of Georges note
336
Napoleon resolves to assume the imperial crown
338
This explains his murdering the Duc dEnghien ib 42 First broaching of the project to the senate
339
The tribunate is put forward to make the proposal in public
341
Speech of the movers on the occasion ib 45 Honourable resistance of Carnot
342
Universal adulation with which Napoleon was surrounded His answer to the senate
343
Key which it affords to his whole policy on the throne
345
He is declared Emperor of the French General concurrence of the nation ib 49 Rank conferred on his family and creation of the marshals of the empi...
346
Rapid progress of court etiquette
347
Dignified protest of Louis XVIII
348
His coronation by the Pope resolved on ib 53 Arrival of the Pope at Paris
350
Result of the appeal to the people on the subject of the hereditary suc cession
352
Ceremony of the coronation ib 56 Distribution of eagles to the army
354
Splendour of the imperial court
355
Napoleon refuses any accession of territory to the Holy See ib 60 Reflections on these events
356
Difference between the English and French revolutions
357
Which was all owing to the violence and injustice of the French convul sion
358
Vast concentration of influence at this period in the bands of government
359
Total destruction of the liberty of the press
360
CHAPTER XXXIX
362
But to disguise it he proposes peace to Great Britain
363
His letter to the King of England ib 4 Answer of the British government
364
Great influence of the French press in Napoleons favour
365
Speech of Napoleon to the senate
366
Commencement of indirect taxation in France and flattering state of the finances
367
Public announcement of the alliance with Russia in the King of Englands opening speech to parliament
368
Important negotiations with the Russian ambassador at London
369
Basis here assumed for the whole revolutionary war
370
Treaties between Russia Prussia and Sweden and continued jealousy of Prussia towards Austria
371
Supplies for 1805 ib 13 Other parliamentary measures
372
Charges against Lord Melville
373
His impeachment and acquittal
374
The comparative toleration enjoyed under George III Reasons which induced its being only partial
375
Argument in favour of further relaxation from the Irish parliament hav ing now merged in the English one
377
The present expediency of that relaxation urged ib 20 The injury done to the Catholic population by the exclusive system
378
Answer of Lords Hawkesbury Sidmouth and Eldon
379
Argument against emancipation from the subordination of the Catholics to a foreign power
380
The present inexpediency of further concessions
381
Inefficiency of all past concession to allay the discontents of the country It is rejected by a large majority
382
Reflections on this subject Total failure of Catholic emancipation to pacify the country
383
Causes of this apparent anomaly
384
The immense confiscation of land in former times
385
The vesting of the forfeited estates in absentees ib 29 And total unfitness of the Irish at present for a free constitution
387
Important observations of Mr Locke on toleration
388
Dangerous mistake in giving the Irish political power
390
Measures of Napoleon at this period ib 33 Change of government in Holland
391
And assumption of the iron crown of Lombardy by the French Emperor
392
Napoleon assumes the crown of Lombardy ib 36 His journey into Italy
393
Eugene appointed Viceroy of Italy and great improvements in his kingdom
400
Treaty offensive and defensive between Russia and England and its objects
406
Napoleon repairs to Boulogne to superintend the English expedition
413
Rapid improvement in the character and babits of the army
419
Operations of the combined fleets of France and Spain to second
426
Combined fleet had returned to Europe Its secret orders
433
Energetic measures of the Admiralty when they received his despatches
435
The combined fleet is outstripped by the British brig with the despatches
436
Sir Robert Calders action ib 80 The two fleets separate without decisive success
438
Vast importance of this action Napoleons conduct on receiving the intelligence of it
439
It totally defeats his welllaid designs
440
Cruel injustice to which Sir Robert Calder was meanwhile subjected ib 84 Sir Robert Calder is brought to a courtmartial
442
Nelson returns to England ib 86 Napoleon orders the combined fleet again to put to sea but it makes for Cadiz instead of Brest
443
Gantheaume in vain leaves Brest to meet them 88 Napoleons designs are in consequence entirely ruined and he sets off for Paris
445
Austria had been making hostile preparations
447
Both parties warmly assail the court of Munich with proposals for alliance
448
It finally joins France
450
The Austrians cross the Inn Forces on both sides
451
The army of England marches from Boulogne to the Rhine
452
Immense preparations of Napoleon
453
His address to the senate ib 96 Entire breaking up of the armament at Boulogne
454
The combined fleet is ordered nevertheless to sail from Cadiz
455
Restoration of the Gregorian Calendar
456
Enthusiastic reception of Nelson by the fleet
457
His stratagem to induce the enemy to leave the harbour
458
Which is completely successful
459
Dispositions on both sides
460
Magnificent aspect of the fleets as they approached each other
462
Order in which the English fleet bears down
463
Battle of Trafalgar Heroic conduct of Collingwood
464
Nelson next breaks the line
465
And engages the enemy in close combat
466
Nelson is mortally wounded
467
Details of the action in other quarters
468
Victory everywhere declares for the British
469
Nelsons last hours and death ib 113 Vast magnitude of the victory
470
Violent tempest and disasters to the prizes
473
Courteous intercourse with the Spaniards at Cadiz
475
Mingled joy and grief in Britain on the occasion
476
Honours granted to the family of Nelson ib 118 Character of that naval hero
477
Victory of Sir R Strachan
479
Reflections on the decisive nature of these successes
480
Reflections on the manoeuvre of breaking the line
481
Which is safe only to the superior and braver power
483
And on the introduction of steam into naval warfare
484
What if Napoleon had succeeded in effecting a landing ? His designs if he had done so
485
And the probabilities of their success
486
Their probable result
487
CHAPTER XL
489
Union of different races and nations which compose the monarchy
490
Remarkable manner in which the Austrians have held together their empire
491
Great national reverses which this united spirit bas enabled Austria to withstand
492
Which were all overcome by the steady attachment of the provinces
493
Reflections on the opposite state of the British empire ib 7 Superficial extent population and revenue of the Austrian empire
494
Situation of Austria Statistical details regarding that monarchy
495
Diversity of surface and natural productions in its provinces
496
General aspect of Bohemia Moravia Galicia and Hungary
497
Variety of races in Austria
499
Military resources of the empire
500
Composition and strength of the Austrian army
501
The military colonies
502
Mode of obtaining men for the army and officers
503
The great breeding stations for the cavalry
505
Taxation and finances of the empire
506
Foreign and internal commerce
507
General prosperity of the Austrian people
508
Their habits and character
509
Causes of this remarkable wellbeing of the Austrian peasantry
510
Provision for the poor in Austria
511
Austrian system of education
513
Religious institutions of the empire
514
General principle of the Austrian government
515
Vast natural capabilities of Austria
516
Austria is in fact a confederation of monarchies
517
Civil government in the Imperial dominions
518
Public debt of Austria
519
Depreciation of the Austrian paper during the war and present sinkingfund
521
Her government and policy ib 32 Her jealousy of Prussia and reliance on England
522
Leading persons of its cabinet at this period
523
Russia its rapid growth and steady policy ib 35 Statistics of the Empire
524
And state of the army
525
Character and manners of the Emperor Alexander
527
Austria deceived by Napoleons measures crosses the Inn
528
Her troops advance through Bavaria to the Black Forest
529
Efforts of Napoleon to gain Prussia
530
Negotiations between the two powers The Russians are denied a passage through the Prussian territories
531
March of the French troops towards Bavaria
532
Composition and direction of these forces
533
Violation of the Prussian territory by Bernadottes corps
535
Great indignation excited by this at Berlin ib 46 Hostile measures adopted by the cabinet of Berlin
536
Measures concerted between Russia Sweden and England in the north of Germany and neutrality of Naples
537
Napoleons proclamation to his troops
538
Movements of the French troops to surround the Austrians
539
Macks defensive arrangements ib 51 Four thousand Imperialists are cut to pieces by Murat
540
Recompenses bestowed by Napoleon on the soldiers engaged
541
The French sweep entirely round the Austrian position
542
Measures of Mack to extricate himself
543
Bloody combat at Hasslach
544
Capitulation of four thousand Austrians in Memmingen and complete investment of Ulm
545
Napoleons address to his soldiers at the bridge of the Lech
546
Mack resolves to detach the Archduke Ferdinand to Bohemia and himself remain at Ulm
547
Description of the Austrian position at Elchingen
548
Combat of Elchingen
549
Retreat of the Archduke Ferdinand with great loss
550
Surrender of Werneck with eight thousand men
551
The heights round Ulm are carried by Napoleon
552
Negotiations for the surrender of Mack
553
He capitulates at first conditionally ib 66 And then unconditionally
555
The army of Mack defiles before Napoleon ib 68 Feelings of the two armies on the occasion
557
Napoleons message to the senate ib His proclamation to his soldiers note
558
The blame of these disasters really divided between Mack and the Aulic Council
559
Errors of the cabinet of Vienna in the general plan of the campaign
560
The Archduke Charles kept on the defensive in Italy
561
Position of the French at Verona ib 74 Forcing of the bridge of Verona
562
Bloody but indecisive actions at Caldiero ib 76 Desperate conflict in the centre
564
The French are in the end repulsed
565
The Archduke resolves to retreat to cover Vienna
566
Gallant conduct of the Austrian rearguard ib 80 The Archduke continues his retreat to Laybach in Carinthia
567
Advance of Napoleons army through Bavaria
568
Defensive measures of the Austrians
569
Increasing irritation of Prussia
570
Arrival of Alexander at Berlin and conclusion of a treaty with Russia
572
Nocturnal visit to the tomb of the Great Frederick ib 86 Prussia subsequently relapses into her temporising system
573
Opinions on the subject in a council of war at Potsdam
574
Landing of the Allies in Hanover
575
Desperate conflict in storming the heights
576
Surrender of Jellachich
578
Bold enterprise and final failure of the Prince de Rohan ib 93 Napoleon advances into Upper Austria
579
His measures at Lintz to envelop Kutusoff
580
Austrian proposals of peace which come to nothing
581
Kutusoff withdraws to the left bank of the Danube
582
Continued advance of the French towards Vienna
583
Destruction of part of Mortiers corps by Kutusoff
584
Desperate action at Dürrenstein
585
The French are at length successful
586
Mortier recrosses the Danube
587
Napoleon advances rapidly on Vienna
588
Description of that city
589
Seizure of the bridge of Vienna
590
Discreditable stratagem by which it was seized
591
Napoleon passes through Vienna and establishes headquarters at Schönbrun
592
Subsequent movements of the armies
593
Finesse of Kutusoff in parrying the attempts of the French to circum vent him
594
Heroic action of Bagrathion who at length makes good his retreat
595
Junction of the Russian armies and critical position of Napoleon
596
Able measures of Napoleon to avert this danger
597
Conduct of the French at Vienna
598
Forces on the two sides
599
Napoleon reconnoitres the field of Austerlitz
600
Simulate negotiations on both sides to gain time
601
Conversation between Napoleon and Alexanders aidedecamp
604
Haugwitz arrives from Berlin ib 119 The Allies advance to Wischau
605
Preparatory movements on both sides
606
Napoleons measures to draw the enemy on
607
Allied order of battle
609
Description of the field of battle
610
Disposition of the French troops
611
Nocturnal illumination of the French lines ib 126 Movements on both sides in the morning
612
Napoleon at length orders the attack
613
Battle of Austerlitz
614
The French cut through the Russian centre
615
Progress of the action on the French left
616
Vehement conflict of the Russian and French Imperial Guards
618
Decisive charge of Rapp with the French cavalry of the Guard
619
Decisive successes of the French
620
Victory also declares for the French on their left
621
Results of the battle
622
Dangers of Napoleons situation notwithstanding his success
623
The Austrians sue for an armistice
624
Interview of the Emperor Francis with Napoleon ib 139 Armistice with Russia
626
Armistice of Austerlitz
627
Dissimulation of Prussia and accommodation with that power
628
Matchless effrontery and perfidy of Prussia
629
Treaty of alliance with Prussia which gains Hanover
630
Indignation this treaty excited at Berlin
631
Affairs of Naples
632
And of the north of Germany
633
Peace of Pressburg
634
Secret articles of the treaty
636
Sentence of dethronement of the King of Naples
637
Reflections on this step ib 152 Secret views of Napoleon in this step
639
Napoleons return to Vienna Munich the Rhine and Paris ib 154 Reflections on the campaign
641
Importance of the valley of the Danube as the theatre of contest be tween France and Austria
642
Dangers of Napoleons position before the battle of Austerlitz
643
Vast growth of the military power of France during the peace
644
Similar growth during peace characterised all the reign of Napoleon ib 159 Justification which this affords of the British policy during the war
646
Errors of the Allies in the plan of the campaign
647
And their great imprudence
648
Ruinous effects of the indecision of Prussia
650
Ability displayed by Mr Pitt in the formation of this confederacy
651
Its failure is no impeachment of the justice of his principles ib 166 His defective military combination
652
His last illness and death
653
His early life education and first entrance into public life
654
Character of Mr Pitt and his mighty achievements ib 170 Principles of his domestic administration
655
How he was first drawn into the war
656
He became the great champion against the French Revolution
657
Progressive and steady growth of his fame
658
Erroneous views of foreign writers on his designs
659
His errors
660
Opinion of the democratic party in England of him
662
His private character Funeral honours paid to him ib APPENDIX
665

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Page 460 - my plan of attack, as far as a man dare venture to guess at the very uncertain position the enemy may be found in: but it is to place you perfectly at ease respecting my intentions, and to give full scope to your judgment for carrying them into effect. We can, my dear Coll, have no little jealousies. We have only one great object in view, that of annihilating our enemies, and getting a glorious peace for our country. No man has more confidence in another than I have in you; and no man will render...
Page 389 - I say these have no right to be tolerated by the magistrate; as neither those that will not own and teach the duty of tolerating all men in matters of mere religion. For what do all these and the like doctrines signify, but that they may, and are ready upon any occasion to seize the government, and possess themselves of the estates and fortunes of their fellowsubjects; and that they only ask leave to be tolerated by the magistrates so long, until they find themselves strong enough to effect it?
Page 458 - May the great God, whom I adore, enable me to fulfil the expectations of my country ; and if it is his good pleasure that I should return, my thanks will never cease being offered up to the throne of his mercy. If it is his good providence to cut short my days upon earth, I bow with the greatest submission, relying that he will protect those so dear to me whom I may leave behind. His will be done. Amen! Amen! Amen!
Page 469 - as that officer, though often sent for, could not leave the deck, Nelson feared that some fatal cause prevented him, and repeatedly cried : " Will no one bring Hardy to me ? He must be killed ! He is surely dead!
Page 477 - Nelson — so the gunner of the Victory called them ; and when, at his interment, his flag was about to be lowered into the grave, the sailors who assisted at the ceremony with one accord rent it in pieces, that each might preserve a fragment while he lived.
Page 467 - Hardy, the chaplain, and the medical attendants. He himself being certain, from the sensation in his back, and the gush of blood...
Page 461 - May the Great God whom I worship, grant to my Country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious Victory; and may no misconduct in anyone tarnish it; and may humanity after Victory be the predominant feature in the British Fleet. For myself individually, I commit my life to Him who made me, and may His blessing light upon my endeavours for serving my Country faithfully.
Page 470 - ten ships have struck, but five of the van have tacked, and show an intention to bear down upon the Victory. I have called two or three of our fresh ships round, and have no doubt of giving them a drubbing." "I hope," said Nelson, "none of our ships have struck?" Hardy answered, "There was no fear of that.
Page 637 - No, no ! The dynasty of Naples has ceased to reign. Its existence is incompatible with the repose of Europe and the honour of my crown.
Page 477 - There was reason to suppose from the appearances upon opening the body, that in the course of nature he might have attained, like his father, to a good old age. Yet he cannot be said to have fallen prematurely whose work was done ; nor ought he to be lamented, who died so full of honours, and at the height of human fame.

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