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greater purity and holiness, than under the more legal and imperfect dispensation of Moses. It is undoubtedly true, that those sins and imperfections, which were consistent with a state of

grace

under the Mosaic dispensation, are not so now under the Christian dispensation; .wherein not only we have more light and knowledge, but Christians indeed do obtain more purifying and quickening influences of the Spirit than they then ordinarily did. There is, therefore, no room to extenuate our falls into sin, by the examples of the Jewish saints.

For though that ministration was glorious, yet the ministration of the Spirit is more glorious, has a glory that vastly excelleth. By the “ beholding of which glory of the Lord, we are changed into the same image from glory to glory.” Our enjoying the promises of the Gospel, lays us under the strongest and most indispensable obligations, to “ cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of flesh and spirit, and to perfect holiness in the fear of God.” God forbid that

any should continue in sin, that grace may abound, or turn the grace of God into lasciviousness! This would determine us to be “ungodly men, who deny the only Lord God, and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Thence it is, that the disobedience of Gospel sinners will bring upon them the greatest and most dreadful damnation. See Heb. x. 29.

4. Good works are necessary, as expressions of our gratitude to God for all his goodness to us, more especially for Gospel grace, and most especially for the gracious influences of his blessed Spirit. Impossible it is for us to have any due conception how great our debt of gratitude is to our

of us

infinite Benefactor. “He has made us, and not we ourselves; his hands have framed and fashioned us round about.” He has preserved us through innumerable difficulties and dangers; and all our lives continually followed us with loving kindness and tender mercies. He has made this mighty globe for our use, with all its amazing variety of furniture, fitted to supply us with whatever is necessary, convenient, comfortable, or delightful. He has distinguished us from very much the greatest part of our fellow-creatures, by the abundance of our enjoyments, and the greatness of our privileges. And if all these, and the innumerable other instances of the inexpressible kindness and goodness of God to us, be not sufficient to excite our gratitude, and to attract our affections to such an infinite fountain of benevolence, yet certainly our redemption by Christ, our enjoyment of Gospel ordinances, our advantages to live to God in this world, and to be eternally happy in the enjoyment of him in the future state of everlasting light and love, are enough to carry our minds beyond admiration, and even to overwhelm them with astonishment.

And what returns does the glorious God expect from us for all this ? No more than the love and obedience of our thankful hearts and lives. No more than to live to him, and delight in him; gratefully to receive, and faithfully to improve the benefits he is bestowing

He requires nothing of us but that we should be ready to every good work, out of love and gratitude to God. How unworthy shall we therefore be for ever, of one smile of his countenance, or the least favour and kindness, if the infinite goodness

upon us.

of God, his infinite love and compassion in Christ, does not constrain us to renounce our lusts and idols, and make it our delightful endeavour to seek and serve him ! He may well expostulate with such, as with his ancient people, “Will ye thus requite the Lord, O foolish people, and unwise !" He justly may, and certainly will exclude such from the glory and blessedness of his eternal praises, who have not hearts to love him, and serve him, and praise him here. They who have ever tasted that the Lord is gracious, and have any becoming sense of their obligations to him, will study what they shall render to the Lord for all his benefits; they will delight in endeavours to glorify him; they will be solicitously careful of a constant conformity to his will, and take a peculiar pleasure and pains in following after holiness.

5. As I have distinctly considered in my last, good works are necessary evidences of the truth and sincerity of our faith in Christ.

And I need only add here, that it is a faithful saying, which cannot be too much insisted upon, that they who pretend to have believed in God, must be careful to maintain good works. All their profession of religion, all their imaginary faith in Christ, all their peace and joy, all their appearance in the cause of truth, all their seeming zeal for the glory of God, the interest of religion, and the conversion and salvation of sinners, or whatever else they may suppose evin dences of their renewed state, will prove but as sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal, without a real life of good works. Such are greatly to be pitied, who can have peace from any supposed experiences

infinite Benefactor. “ He has made us, and not we ourselves; his hands have framed and fashioned us round about.” He has preserved us through innumerable difficulties and dangers; and all our lives continually followed us with loving kindness and tender mercies. He has made this mighty globe for our use, with all its amazing variety of furniture, fitted to supply us with whatever is necessary, convenient, comfortable, or delightful. He has distinguished us from very much the greatest part of our fellow-creatures, by the abundance of our enjoyments, and the greatness of our privileges. And if all these, and the innumerable other instances of the inexpressible kindness and goodness of God to us, be not sufficient to excite our gratitude, and to attract our affections to such an infinite fountain of benevolence, yet certainly our redemption by Christ, our enjoyment of Gospel ordinances, our advantages to live to God in this world, and to be eternally happy in the enjoyment of him in the future state of everlasting light and love, are enough to carry our minds beyond admiration, and even to overwhelm them with astonishment. And what returns does the glorious God expect from us for all this? No more than the love and obedience of our thankful hearts and lives. No more than to live to him, and delight in him ; gratefully to receive, and faithfully to improve the benefits he is bestowing upon us.

He requires nothing of us but that we should be ready to every good work, out of love and gratitude to God. How unworthy shall we therefore be for ever, of one smile of his countenance, or the least favour and kindness, if the infinite goodness

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