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within us an insatiable desire to know more of the future; and the flight thitherward of the spirit of one who in life has been very dear, perhaps the dearest, seems to cast a soft halo of light into that future. Then the Christian finds the blessed promises of God, and the death and resurrection of Christ, unspeakably precious; he feels the need of the heavenly Comforter, and, while seeking to cast all his care on him, “knowing that he careth for him," what may have seemed the dark and distant future is illumed with an almost unclouded noonday brightness. Every earthly woe, every trial and care, can be mitigated by the consoling and sustaining influences of our holy religion. God has promised to “comfort all who mourn,” if, in the time of their sorrow, they seek him.

Prayer, and reading the word of God, will not only afford sweet consolation in the deepest affliction, but prove a tower of defence, a shield against the temptations that frequently assail us at such times. Another source of comfort is to be found in the perusal of the writings of good and holy men who have felt the same bitter heart grief, and whose works abound with passages most touchingly fitted to console under the heaviest afflictions ; teaching us how to meet, bear, and wisely use all such chastenings for our spiritual advancement. Our literature, too, contains much prose and poetry addressed to the heart stricken, desponding, and des

olate, who, in times of bereavement, love to linger among the “graves of their household,” and dwell upon the state of the departed.

These “ Voices from the Silent Land” have been collected in the freshness of a very deep affliction, and completed before its daily-gushing anguish had passed away. The compiler's aim and object is to induce some to make a good and wise use of afflictive dispensations, to see the hand of God in them all, and to feel that "the Judge of all the earth will do right." She can only desire that the perusal of these pages may prove as sweet and soothing a source of consolation to others as their preparation has been to herself. The women of the United States, however elevated and affluent their station, are rarely entirely free from the perplexities and anxieties of domestic cares, and can seldom find sufficient leisure to peruse or examine all the works from which this volume has been gathered; therefore it is designed more particularly for my countrywomen whom God, in infinite wisdom, may have caused to pass under the rod of affliction, but who, I trust, can say, with the poet,

“ 'Tis sweet, as year by year we lose
Friends out of sight, in faith to muse
How grows in paradise our store.”

M. N. W. May 10, 1851.

Ν Ο Τ Ε.

The compiler would express her grateful acknowledgments to Mrs. Julia Norton, Messrs. W. C. Bryant, H. W. Longfellow, N. P. Willis, Park Benjamin, Charles Sprague, J. T. Fields, and others, for kindly granting her permission to publish the articles, which appear in this volume, from their pens.

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Consolatory Epistle,

St. Basil, .

The much-loved Dead,

Mary E. Lee, 60

Days of Tribulation,

Krummacher, 64

The Spirit's Land,

Author of Selwin, 65

A Death Bed,

Aldrich,

67

Departed Friends,

Henry,

67

The Departed,

Benjamin, 68

Meekness under the Chastening Rod,

Leighton,

70

On the Death of Edward Payson, D. D.,

Willis, .

71

The Tomb not fearful to the Christian,

Hervey,

73

Footsteps of Angels,

Longfellow, 74

To a Bereaved Sister,

S. W. Williams, 76

To my Brother in Heaven,

H. W. Rockwell, 77

Bereavement,

E. B. Browning, 79

The early ead,

Clark,

80

Improvement of Amfiction,

Hall,

81

My Mother's Grave,

Aldrich,

82

Friend after Friend departs,

Montgomery, 84

Benefit of Affliction,

Baxter,

85

Consolation sought and found,

Bowring,

86

I see thee still,

Sprague,

88

Words to a mourning Husband,

Hall,

89

She sleeps that still and placid Sleep,

Hervey,

91

Knowledge of Christian Friends in a Future World, Mason,

93

The Future Life,

Bryant,

94

I knew that we must part,

Sprague,

95

Sanctified Afflictions,

Flavel, .

On the Death of a Sister,

Anonymous, 99

“Sorrow not, even as others which have no hope,” . C. Wesley, 101

Fear of Death,

Jeremy Taylor, . 102

On the Death of a Friend,

. Heber, .

104

In Affliction dwell upon the Brevity of Life, Brooks,

105

Dirge in Autumn,

Clark,

106

Thoughts at the Grave of Beloved Ones,

Mrs. J. Norton, 108

The Graves of a Household,

Hemans,

110

Retrospect,

Tupper,

111

Heavenward,

Rev. A. C. Coxe, 113

The Pious Dead, .

Krummacher, 115

Recognition of the Saints in Heaven,

Dick,

116

Heaven,

Anonymous, . 117

The Spirit's Echo,

Mrs. J. Norton, 118

Detached Thoughts,

119

Resignation,

127

Children in Heaven,

Anonymous, .

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