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FROM

THE SILENT LAND;

OR,

LEAVES OF CONSOLATION FOR

THE AFFLICTED.

BY

MRS. H. DWIGHT WILLIAMS.

O, soothe us, haunt us, night and day,
Ye gentle spirits far away,
With whom we shared the cup of grace,
Then parted - ye to Christ's embrace,
We to the lonesome world again i
Yet mindful of th' unearthly strain
Practised with you at Eden's door,
To be sung on, where angels soar,
With blended voices evermore.

KEBLE.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY JOHN P. JEWETT AND COMPANY.

CLEVELAND, OHIO :
JEWETT, PROCTOR, AND WORTHINGTON.

LONDON: LOW AND COMPANY.

BV 4900 W55 1853

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1853, by

JOHN P. JEWETT AND COMPANY,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

ADOVBR THEOL. SORRY

FEB 29 1908

-LIBRARY.

59, 277

STEREOTYPED AT THE
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY

METCALP AND COMPANY,

PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.

DEDICATED

то

The Memory of One

WHO HAS DEPARTED TO

THE SILENT LAND;

A MUCH-LOVED AND DEEPLY-LAMENTED BROTHER, WHOSE
EARLY AND IRREPARABLE LOSS HAS CAUSED

THE GATHERING OF TIIESE

LEAVES OF CONSOLATION.

Why, he but sleeps :
If he be gone, he'll make his grave a bed.

With fairest flowers,
I'll sweeten thy sad grave. Thou shalt not lack
The flower that's like thy face, pale primrose, nor
The azured harebell, like thy veins; no, nor
The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander,
Outsweetened not thy breath ; the redbreast would,
With charitable bill, bring thee all this;
Yea, and furred moss besides, when flowers are none
To winterground thy corse.”

PRE FACE.

"Into the Silent Land !” Ah, who can say that the footsteps of none he once loved on earth have entered the “shadows of that pale realm”? Death, sooner or later, cometh to all: the white and venerable locks of the aged, the maturity of manhood, the ruddy freshness of youth, whose flashing eye is salient with life and health, and the tender bud of infancy, — all soon, too soon, fall before the scythe of the pitiless destroyer.

“ The air is full of farewells for the dying,

And mournings for the dead.”

No suffering, no anguish, is like unto that of the deeply heart-stricken mourner, as he bendeth over his forever-hushed, but beloved, dead. Often, at such times, the heart and soul, though wonderfully stirred, feels a grief “ too deep for tears.” A link of the chain that bound him to earth has been rudely riven ; and the vanity of this life, the nearness of eternity, with its all-absorbing interests, are felt and acknowledged. Such sad visitations of Providence induce

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