Contributions to Solar Physics: I. A Popular Account of Inquiries Into the Physical Constitution of the Sun, with Special Reference to Recent Spectroscopic Researches; II. Communications to the Royal Society of London, and the French Academy of Sciences, with Notes

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1874 - Sun - 676 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 102 - Yet still, from time to time, vague and forlorn, From the soul's subterranean depth upborne As from an infinitely distant land, Come airs, and floating echoes, and convey A melancholy into all our day.
Page 211 - I am purposing them, to be considered of and examined, an account of a philosophical discovery which induced me to the making of the said telescope ; and I doubt not but will prove much more grateful than the communication of that instrument ; being in my judgment the oddest, if not the most considerable detection which hath hitherto been made in the operations of nature.
Page iii - CONTRIBUTIONS TO SOLAR PHYSICS. By J. NORMAN LOCKYER, FRSI A Popular Account of Inquiries into the Physical Constitution of the Sun, with especial reference to Recent Spectroscopic Researches. II. Communications to the Royal Society of London and the French Academy of Sciences, with Notes. Illustrated by 7 Coloured Lithographic Plates and 175 Woodcuts. Royal 8vo. cloth, extra gilt, price 3u.
Page 443 - ... red flames" which total eclipses have revealed to us in the sun's atmosphere, although they escape all other methods of observation at other times?
Page 193 - I conclude further, that the dark lines of the solar spectrum which are not evoked by the atmosphere of the earth, exist in consequence of the presence, in the incandescent atmosphere of the sun, of those substances which in the spectrum of a flame produce bright lines at the same place.
Page 527 - ... we were in a position to determine the atmospheric pressure operating in a prominence in which the red and green lines are nearly of equal width, and in the chromosphere, through which the green line gradually expands as the sun is approached. With regard to the higher prominences, we have...
Page 220 - I need hardly point out to you that the determination of the above-mentioned facts leads us necessarily to several important modifications of the received theory of the physical constitution of our central luminary — the theory which we owe to Kirchhoff, who based it upon his examination of the solar spectrum.
Page 76 - A few seconds before the commencement of the totality, the stars burst out, and surrounding the dark Moon on all sides is seen a glorious halo, generally of a silver-white light; this is called the Corona. It is slightly radiated in structure, and extends sometimes beyond the Moon to a distance equal to our satellite's diameter. Besides this, rays of light, called Aigrettes, diverge from the Moon's edge, and appear to be shining through the light of the corona.
Page 20 - ... do at the edge of a deep hole of clear water. The exceedingly definite shape of these objects; their exact similarity one to another; and the way in which they lie across and athwart each other (except where they form a sort of bridge across a spot, in which case they seem to affect a common direction, that, namely, of the bridge itself),—all these characters seem quite repugnant to the notion of their being of a vaporous, a cloudy, or a fluid nature.
Page 219 - F line were phenomena depending on and indicating varying pressures, we were in a position to determine the atmospheric pressure operating in a prominence in which the red and green lines are nearly of equal width, and in the chromosphere, through which the green line gradually expands as the sun is approached.

Bibliographic information