Rural Repository, Volume 13

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W. B. Stoddard, 1837

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Page 70 - The time would e'er be o'er, And I on thee should look my last, And thou shouldst smile no more! And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again; And still the thought I will not brook, That I must look in vain. But when I speak — thou dost not say What thou ne'er...
Page 5 - Whatever argument may be drawn from particular examples, superficially viewed, a thorough examination of the subject will evince that the art of war is at once comprehensive and complicated ; that it demands much previous study; and that the possession of it, in its most improved and perfect state, is always of great moment to the security of a nation.
Page 116 - To leave nor track nor trace. And yet, with Him who counts the sands. And holds the waters in his hands, I know a lasting record stands, Inscribed against my name, Of all this mortal part has wrought; Of all this thinking soul has thought ; And from these fleeting moments caught For glory or for shame.
Page 113 - ... difficulty. I had not a farthing on earth, nor a friend to give me one : pen, ink, and paper, therefore, (in despite of the flippant remark of Lord Orford,) were, for the most part, as completely out of my reach, as a crown and sceptre. There was indeed a resource ; but the utmost caution and secrecy were necessary in applying to it. I beat out pieces of leather as smooth as possible and wrought my problems on them with a blunted awl: for the rest, my memory was tenacious, and I could multiply...
Page 131 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 16 - The more we live, more brief appear Our life's succeeding stages : A day to childhood seems a year, And years like passing ages. The gladsome current of our youth, Ere passion yet disorders, Steals lingering like a river smooth Along its grassy borders. But as the care-worn cheek grows wan, And sorrow's shafts fly thicker, Ye Stars, that measure life to man, Why seem your courses quicker ? When joys have lost their bloom and breath And life itself is vapid, Why, as we reach the Falls of Death...
Page 116 - twill shortly be With every mark on earth from me ; A wave of dark oblivion's sea Will sweep across the place Where I have trod the sandy shore Of time, and been, to he no more ; Of me, my frame, the name I bore, To leave no track nor trace.
Page 70 - If thou wouldst stay e'en as thou art, All cold, and all serene, I still might press thy silent heart, And where thy smiles have been ! While e'en thy chill bleak corse I have, Thou seemest still mine own, But there I lay thee in thy grave — And I am now alone...
Page 70 - I still might press thy silent heart, and where thy smiles have been ! While e'en thy chill bleak corse I have, thou seemest still mine own ; But there, I lay thee in thy grave — and I am now alone ! I do not think, where'er thou art, thou hast forgotten me ; And I, perhaps, may soothe this heart, in thinking, too, of thee : Yet there was round thee such a dawn of light ne'er seen before, As Fancy never could have drawn, and never can restore 1 7o.—GO, FORGET MB.—lTo^s.
Page 5 - The institution of a military academy is also recommended by cogent reasons. However pacific the general policy of a nation may be, it ought never to be without an adequate stock of military knowledge for emergencies.

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