The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New monthly magazine and literary journal (and humorist) [afterw.] The New monthly (magazine)., Volume 23

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Page 323 - O ! the blood more stirs To rouse a lion than to start a hare.
Page 395 - Let every soul be subject to higher powers : for there is no power but from God ; and those that are, are ordained of God.
Page 11 - I have almost forgot the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir, As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once start me.
Page 170 - JE ne suis pas de ceux qui disent : Ce n'est rien, C'est une femme qui se noie. Je dis que c'est beaucoup; et ce sexe vaut bien Que nous le regrettions, puisqu'il fait notre joie.
Page 153 - Statutes in that case made and provided, and against the peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, his crown, and dignity.
Page 536 - Has hurried me off to the Po, Forget not Medora Trevilian: — My own Araminta, say "No!" We parted! but sympathy's fetters Reach far over valley and hill; I muse o'er your exquisite letters, And feel that your heart is mine still; And he who would share it with me, love, — The richest of treasures below, — If he's not what Orlando should be, love, My own Araminta, say "No!
Page 312 - For the saying which he cried by the word of the LORD against the altar in Beth-el, and against all the houses of the high places which are in the cities of Samaria, shall surely come to pass.
Page 312 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because ye build the tombs of the prophets, and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous, and say, If we had been in the days of our fathers, we would not have been partakers with them in the blood of the prophets.
Page 536 - No!' If he wears a top-boot in his wooing, If he comes to you riding a cob, If he talks of his baking or brewing, If he puts up his feet on the hob, If he ever drinks port after dinner, If his brow or his breeding is low, If he calls himself 'Thompson' or 'Skinner', My own Araminta, say 'No!
Page 395 - Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme; or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well.

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