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day arpose me, I should be worse off than with d quaking fit.

There can be no virtue in hazarding life, where there is no sense of its value: he only is the courageous man, who feeling the importance of life, as it regards the present and a future state, is not afraid, in a good and honourable cause, to expose himself to the perils of death. The scandalous practice of single combat, or avenging personal affronts by duel, cannot make a virtuous claim to such principles, and therefore has no right to the honourable name of courage: it was unknown to the heroes of Greece and Rome; and takes its origin from times of ignorance and barbarity.

Even among the northern nations which tolerated the use of duels, they urged in apology for them, that the corruption and vice of the nation were beyond the controul of assaulted by diseases which are loathsome to the eye, and offensive to the smell! concerning the pride of clothing, the wise Solon told Cræsus, who appeared before him in robes of costly magnificence, that peacocks and pheasants were dressed with superior bril

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The splendour of apparel is not however always a criterion of the pride of him, who wears it: the affected contempt and actual negligence of a decent exterior, more frequently points out the character, where that passion has taken much deeper root: for to many an arrogant sloven of the present day, may justly be applied the reproof of Socrates to Antisthenes, I see thy vanity through the . holes of thy coat."

Even of mental accomplishments in the highest perfection, which have the b claim to challenge admiration and swel heart with pride, those who in reality

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them, are usually the most diffident: for it has been well remarked, that ships which are heaviest laden sail lowest, so à mind richly stored with sound and genuine Philo. sophy, is the most humble.

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The wisest man of antiquity summed up the extent of his knowledge in these pithy words, “ I know one thing," says he, which is this, " I know nothing;" yet, alas, pride, that parent sin, which was unbecoming man in his best estate, he retains in the worst. There dribbles the idiot, or raves in a mad-house, he, who, once edified by his wisdom, or charmed by his eloquence !-look at him, who once gave out, “that the stars fell before him, that the earth trembled at his presence, and that he was urge o d!” but where look for

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assaulted by diseases which are loathsome to the eye, and offensive to the smell! concerning the pride of clothing, the wise Solon told Cræsus, who appeared before him in robes of costly magnificence, that peacocks and pheasants were dressed with superior bril

liancy.

The splendour of apparel is not however always a criterion of the pride of him, who wears it: the affected contempt and actual negligence of a decent exterior, more frequently points out the character, where that passion has taken much deeper. root: for to many an arrogant sloven of the present day, may justly be applied the reproof of Socrates to Antisthenes, I see thy vanity through the holes of thy coat."

Even of mental accomplishments in the highest perfection, which have the be claim to challenge admiration and swell heart with pride, those who in reality

them, are usually the most diffident: for it has been well remarked, that ships which are heaviest laden sail lowest, 'so à mind richly stored with sound and genuine Philosophy, is the most humble. ... i

The wisest man of antiquity summed up the extent of his knowledge in these pithy words, “I know one thing," says he, which is this, " I know nothing;" yet, alas, pride, that parent sin, which was unbecoming man in his best estate, he retains in the worst. There dribbles the idiot, or raves in a mad-house, he, who, once edified by his wisdom, or charmed by his eloquence !-look at him, who once gave out, “ that the stars fell before him, that the earth trembled at his presence, and that he was t urge Yod !” but where look for hir

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ngue is condemned to

man* who had

expressed

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