Bilharzia: A History of Imperial Tropical Medicine

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 11, 2003 - Medical - 372 pages
The advent of tropical medicine was a direct consequence of European and American imperialism, when military personnel, colonial administrators, businessmen, and settlers encountered a new set of diseases endemic to the tropics. Professor Farley describes how governments and organizations in Britain, the British colonies, the United States, Central and South America, South Africa, China, and the World Health Organization faced one particular tropical disease, bilharzia or schistosomiasis. Bilharzia is caused by a species of blood vessel-inhabiting parasitic worms and today afflicts over 200 million people in seventy-four countries. Author Farley demonstrates that British and American imperial policies and attitudes largely determined the nature of tropical medicine. Western medical practitioners defined the type of medical system that was imposed on the indigenous populations; they dictated which diseases were important and worthy of study, which diseases were to be controlled, and which control methods were to be used. Historians, historians of medicine, parasitologists, and experts in tropical medicine will find this a fascinating study.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

V
13
VI
31
VII
45
VIII
72
IX
97
X
116
XI
141
XII
157
XV
188
XVI
201
XVII
219
XVIII
233
XIX
249
XX
267
XXI
291
XXII
305

XIII
171
XIV
173

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - Paul Weindling, Health, Race and German Politics between National Unification and Nazism, 1870-1945 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989); Robert N.

Bibliographic information