Narrative of a Voyage Round the World

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Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1835 - Aboriginal Australians - 349 pages

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Page 258 - Had in her sober livery all things clad; Silence accompanied ; for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests, Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale ; She all night long her amorous descant sung: Silence was pleased. Now...
Page 36 - They moved in tracks of shining white, And when they reared, the elfish light Fell off in hoary flakes. Within the shadow of the ship I watched their rich attire: Blue, glossy green, and velvet black, They coiled and swam; and every track Was a flash of golden fire.
Page 258 - Now came still evening on, and twilight grey Had in her sober livery all things clad; Silence accompanied; for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale ; She all night long her amorous descant sung , Silence was...
Page 312 - One had the form of a parrot's head, with a ruff round the neck, and was not ill done. Their canoes are about fifty feet in length, and appear to have been hollowed out of a single tree ; but the pieces which form the gunwales are planks sewed on with the fibres of the cocoa nut, and secured with pegs. These vessels are low, forward, but rise abaft; and, being narrow, are fitted with an outrigger on each side, to keep them steady. A raft, of. greater breadth than the canoe, extends over about half...
Page 123 - ... places, on which a few years ago, settlements, by direction of our government, were formed, but which have since been abandoned, as Dr. Wilson argues, and shews, from very insufficient and mistaken causes. The principal object in forming a settlement on the coast in question, as the author states, was to establish a commercial intercourse with the natives of various islands in the Indian Archipelago, and which, it was imagined, might be brought about through the means of the Malays, who annually...

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