A Study of a Feature of Sixteenth Century Conventionalism as it Reveals Itself in Holinshed's Chronicle

Front Cover
Cornell University., 1910 - English drama - 93 pages
 

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 74 - That thus have hous'd my spirit in his form , To do a message to thee from the king. The mighty king of England dotes on thee: He , that hath power to take away thy life , Hath power to take thine...
Page 68 - Light where they will! Were I upon the sea, As oft I have in many a bitter storm, And saw a dreadful southern flaw at hand, The pilot quaking at the doubtful storm, And all the sailors praying on their knees, Even in that fearful time would I fall down And ask of God, whate'er betide of me, Vengeance on Arden, or some misevent, To show the world what wrong the carl hath done.
Page 65 - What were thy words and mine; did we not both Decree to murder Arden in the night? The heavens can witness, and the world can tell, Before I saw that falsehood look of thine, 'Fore I was tangled with thy 'ticing speech, Arden to me was dearer than my soul, — And shall be still: base peasant, get thee gone, And boast not of thy conquest over me.
Page 46 - My nephews' bloods, Revenge! revenge! doth cry; The headless peers come pressing for revenge; And every one cries, Let the tyrant die, The sun by day shines hotly for revenge ; The moon by night eclipseth for revenge ; The stars are...
Page 56 - I will say nothing of our heads, which sometimes are polled, sometimes curled, or suffered to grow at length like woman's...
Page 84 - Or anything that's ill : so I might work Revenge upon this miser, this black cur, That barks and bites, and sucks the very blood Of me and of my credit. 'Tis all one To be a witch as to be counted one : Vengeance, shame, ruin light upon that canker ! Enter a Black Dog. Dog. Ho ! have I found thee cursing ? now thou art Mine own.
Page 41 - Dei," in king Henry's hand, he wiped away a piece of his fingers withal ! Here I pass over and cut off other gaudes and pageants of pastime showed to him in passing through London, with the flattering verses...
Page 66 - I will tear away the leaves, And all the leaves, and in this golden cover Shall thy sweet phrases and thy letters dwell, And thereon will I chiefly meditate, And hold no other sect but such devotion.
Page 55 - ... of the first, and how little space left wherin to feed the later ! how curious, how nice also are a number of men and women, and how hardlie...
Page 38 - Yet delighted not men so much in her beauty as in her pleasant behaviour. For a proper wit had she, and could both read well and write, merry in company, ready and quick of answer, neither mute nor full of babble, sometimes taunting without displeasure and not without disport.

Bibliographic information