A History of English Prosody from the Twelfth Century to the Present Day, Volume 2

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1908 - English language

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Page 211 - The lonely mountains o'er, And the resounding shore, A voice of weeping heard and loud lament ; From haunted spring, and dale Edged with poplar pale, The parting Genius is with sighing sent ; With flower-inwoven tresses torn The Nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
Page 462 - For love, which scarce collective man can fill ; For patience, sovereign o'er transmuted ill ; For faith, that, panting for a happier seat, Counts death kind nature's signal of retreat : These goods for man the laws of Heaven ordain, These goods He grants who grants the power to gain ; With these celestial Wisdom calms the mind, And makes the happiness she does not find.
Page 239 - OF Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly muse...
Page 22 - Ah. dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
Page 226 - Yet some there be that by due steps aspire To lay their just hands on that golden key That opes the palace of eternity. To such my errand is ; and, but for such, I would not soil these pure ambrosial weeds With the rank vapours of this sin-worn mould.
Page 381 - Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own: He who secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day.
Page 228 - And in sweet madness robb'd it of itself ; But such a sacred and home-felt delight, Such sober certainty of waking bliss, I never heard till now.
Page 17 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain, But, with the motion of all elements, Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page 462 - Yet when the sense of sacred presence fires, And strong devotion to the skies aspires, Pour forth thy fervours for a healthful mind, Obedient passions, and a will resign'd...
Page 154 - Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine ; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine. I sent thee late a rosy wreath, Not so much honouring thee...

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