The American Jurist and Law Magazine, Volume 9; Volume 27

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Freeman & Bolles, 1843 - Law
 

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Page 150 - A libel is the malicious defamation of a person made public by any printing, writing, sign, picture, representation or effigy tending to provoke him to wrath or expose him to public hatred, contempt or ridicule, or to deprive him of the benefits of public confidence and social intercourse...
Page 89 - He shall dwell with thee, even among you, in that place which he shall choose in one of thy gates, where it liketh him best : thou shalt not oppress him.
Page 22 - ... successful exertions in the profession to which I belong. Does he not feel that it is as honourable to owe it to these, as to being the accident of an accident ? To all these noble lords the language of the noble duke is as applicable and as insulting as it is to myself.
Page 398 - evidence,' In legal acceptation, Includes all the means by which any alleged matter of fact, the truth of which Is submitted to Investigation, Is established or disproved.
Page 4 - I did actually live three years with Mr. Chapman, a solicitor, that is to say, I slept three years in his house, but I lived, that is to say, I spent my days in Southampton Row, as you very well remember. There was I, and the future Lord Chancellor, constantly employed from morning to night in giggling and making giggle, instead of studying the law.
Page 192 - Keb., 115, 132, which was an action by the indorsee against the drawer of a bill of exchange. 'The...
Page 125 - In considering these points, it is necessary to ascertain what are the rights and duties of armed, and other ships, navigating the ocean in time of peace. It is admitted, that the right of visitation and search does not. under such circumstances, belong to the public ships of any nation. This right is strictly a belligerent right, allowed by the general consent of nations in time of war, and limited to those occasions.
Page 126 - It is true that it has been held in the courts of this country, that American ships, offending against our laws, and foreign ships in like manner offending within our jurisdiction, may, afterwards, be pursued and seized upon the ocean, and rightfully brought into our ports for adjudication.
Page 22 - Does he not feel that it is as honourable to owe it to these, as to being the accident of an accident? To all these noble lords the language of the noble duke is as applicable and as insulting as it is to myself. But I don't fear to meet it single and alone.
Page 400 - These, as well as the former, are the result of the general experience of a connection between certain facts or things, the one being usually found to be the companion, or the effect, of the other. The...

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