Medical and Physiological Commentaries, Volume 2

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Collins, Keese & Company, 1840 - Medicine - 1531 pages
 

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Page 123 - And every plant of the field before it was in the earth and every herb of the field before it grew for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth and there was not a man to till the ground...
Page 217 - ... where more satisfactory evidence cannot be had, or is not seen ; if the result of examination be, that there appears upon the whole, any the lowest presumption on one side, and none on the other, or a greater presumption on one side, though in the lowest degree greater ; this determines the question, even in matters of speculation ; and in matters of practice, will lay us under an absolute and formal obligation, in point of prudence and of interest, to act upon that presumption or low probability,...
Page 123 - And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 217 - From these things it follows, that in questions of difficulty, or such as are thought so, where more satisfactory evidence cannot be had, or is not seen ; if the result of examination be, that there appears upon the whole, any the lowest presumption on one side, and none on the other, or a greater presumption on one side, though in the lowest degree greater ; this determines the question, even in matters of speculation...
Page 117 - According to tradition, * these thousand years of the reign of Christ and the saints, will be the seventh Millenary of the world : for as God created the world in six days, and rested on the seventh...
Page 575 - Superior beings, when of late they saw A mortal man unfold all Nature's law, Admired such wisdom in an earthly shape, And show'da Newton as we show an ape.
Page 134 - If the intellectual phenomena of man require an immaterial principle superadded to the brain we must equally concede it to those more rational animals which exhibit manifestations differing from some of the human only in degree.
Page 527 - Andral has well pointed out this common result from diverse causes : "It is a law in pathology, that in every organ, the diminution of the quantity of blood which normally it should contain, produces functional disturbances, as well as the presence of an excessive quantity of blood. We have found more than once, the brain and its membranes completely bloodless in children who died in the midst of convulsions. We have also seen the state of coma, in which many of their diseases terminate, coincide...
Page 115 - ... the more nearly do they approach perfection. Even in the utmost refinements of his luxury, and in his choicest delicacies, the same great principle is attended to ; and his sugar and flour, his eggs and butter, in all their various forms and combinations, are nothing more or less, than disguised imitations of the great alimentary prototype MILK, as furnished to him by nature.

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