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fer satisfaciion. No sooner do we pass the line which temperance has drawn, than pernicious effects come forward and shew theinfelves. Could I lay open to your view the monuments of death, they would read a lecture on moderation, much more powerful than any that the most eloquent writers can give. You would behold the graves peopled with the victims of intemperance. You would behold those chambers of darkness hung round, on every side, with the trophies of luxury, drunkenness, and sensuality. So numerous would you find those victims to iniquity, that it may be safely afserted, where war or pestilence have flain their thousands, intemperate pleasure has slain its ten thousands. How long shall it be, ere the fate of your predeceffors in the same course teach you wisdom? How long shall the experience of all ages continue to lift its voice to you in vain? Beholding the ocean on which you are embarked covered with wrecks, are not those fatal fignals sufficient to admonish you of the hidden rock? • We all of us have experienced the effects which any indisposition of the body, even though slight, produces on external prosperity. Visit the gayest and most forTunáte man on earth, only with sleepless nights ; diforder any single organ of the senses ; corrode but one of

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his smallest nerves ; and you shall presently see all his gaiety vanish ; and you shall hear him complain that he is a miserable creature, and express his envy of the peasant and the cottager._And can you believe, that a difease in the foul is less fatal to enjoyment than a disease in the animal frame; or that a sound mind is not as effential as a sound body to the happiness of man? Let us rate sensual gratifications as high as we pleafe, we shall be made to feel that the seat of enjoyment is in the soul. The man of moderation alone brings to all the natural and innocent pleasures, that sound uncorrupted relish, which gives hiin a much fuller enjoyment of them than the pallid and vitiated appetite of the voluptuary can allow him to know. He culls the flower of every allowable gratification, without dwelling upon it, until its sweetness be loft. He stops at the point before enjoyment degenerates into disgust, and pleasure is converted into pain. Moderate and simple pleasure relish high with the temperate; whereas it is a great luck, if the voluptuary does not return disgusted even from a feast.In the pleasures which are regulated by moderation, befides, there is always that dignity which goes along with innocence. No man needs to be ashamed of them. They are consistent with honour; with the favour of VOL. IV.

GOD,

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God, and of man. But the sensualift, who disdains all restraint in his pleasures, is odious in the public eye. His vices become grofs; his character contemptible; and he ends in being a burden both to himfelf and to fociety.

By unhappy excesses, how many amiable dispositions have been corrupted or destroyed! How many rising capacitics and powers have been fuppressed! How many flattering hopes of parents and friends have been totally extinguished! who but must drop a tear over human nature, when he beholds that morning which arose so bright, overcast with such untimely darkness; that good humour which once captivated all hearts, that vivacity which sparkled in every company, those abilities which were fitted for adorning the highest station, all sacrificed at the shrine of low sensuality; and one who was formed for running the fair career of life in the midst of public efteem, cut off by his vices at the beginning of his course, or funk, for the whole of it, into insignificancy and contempt !--Thefe, O sinful Pleasure ! are thy trophies.

Retreat, then, from your dishonourable courses, ye who by licentiousness, extravagance, and vice, are abusers of the world! You are degrading, you are ruining yourselves. You are grossly misemploying the gifts of GOD; and mistake your true interest. Awake then to the pursuit of men of virtue and honour. Break loose froin that magic circle, within which you are at present held. Reject the poisoned cup which the enchantress Pleasure holds up to your lips. Draw aside the veil which the throws over your eyes. You will then see other objects than you now behold. You will fee an abyss opening below your

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feet. You will see Virtue and TEMPERANCE marking out the road, which conducts to true felicity. You will be enabled to discern, that the world is enjoyed to advantage, by none but such as follow those divine guides; and who consider “ PLEASURE AS

THE SEASONING, BUT NOT AS THE BUSINESS OF LIFE.

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SECT.

SECT. LXXII.

ON FORTITUDE.

CHARLOTTE CORDAY was tall and well shaped, of the most graceful

manners and modeft demeanour: there was in her countenance, which was beautiful and engaging, and in all her movements, a mixture of softness and dignity, which were evident indications of a heavenly mind. She came to Paris, and under a feigned pretext gained admission to that chief of republican tyrants, MARAT, in whose breast she plunged a dagger, acknowledged the deed, and justified it by asserting that it was a duty the owed her country and mankind to rid the world of a monster. Her deportment during the trial was modest and dignified. There was so engaging a softness in her countenance, that it was difficult to conceive how the could have armed herself with sufficient intrepidity to execute the deed. Her answers to the questions of the tribunal were full of point and energy. She sometimes surprised the audience by her wit, and excited their admiration by her eloquence. Her face sometimes beamed with sublimity, and was sometimes covered with smiles. She retired while the jury deliberated on their verdict; and when the again entered the tribunal there was a majestic solemnity in her demeanour which perfectly became her situation. She heard her sentence with attention and composure ; and left the court with serenity, her mind being long before prepared even for the last scene. It is difficult to conceive the heroism which she displayed in the way to exccution. There was such an air of chastened exultation thrown over her countenance, that the inspired sentiments of love rather than pity. The spectators as the passed uncovered their heads before her, and others gave loud tokens of applaufe. She alcended the scaffold with undaunted firmness. When the executioner informed her that her feet must be tied to the fatal plank the submitted with a smile. When he took off her handkerchief, the moment before the bent under the fatal ftrokc, she blushed deeply; and her head, which was held up to the multitude the moment after, exhibited this last impression of of

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