Cobbett's Political Register, Volumes 84-85

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Page 753 - IF you should see a flock of pigeons in a field of corn; and if (instead of each picking where and what it liked, taking just as much as it wanted, and no more) you should see ninety-nine of them gathering all they got into a heap ; reserving nothing for themselves but the chaff and the refuse; keeping this heap for one, and that the weakest, perhaps worst...
Page 237 - God hath not left one man so to the mercy of another that he may starve him if he please. God, the Lord and Father of all, has given no one of His children such a property in his peculiar portion of the things of this world, but that He has given his needy brother a right to the surplusage of his goods, so that it cannot justly be denied him when his pressing wants call for it...
Page 239 - Those rights then which God and nature have established, and are therefore called natural rights, such as are life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by the municipal laws to be inviolable. On the contrary, no human legislature has power to abridge or destroy them, unless the owner shall himself commit some act that amounts to a forfeiture.
Page 237 - WHETHER we consider natural reason, which tells us that men, being once born, have a right to their preservation, and consequently to meat and drink and such other things as nature affords for their subsistence...
Page 45 - ... it is vain to hope for, any permanent and extensive advantage from any system of emigration which does not primarily apply to Ireland; whose population, unless some other outlet be opened to them, must shortly fill up every vacuum created in England or in Scotland, and reduce the labouring classes to a uniform state of degradation and misery.
Page 753 - ... oftentimes the feeblest and worst of the whole set, a child, a woman, a madman, or a fool) ; getting nothing for themselves all the while, but a little of the coarsest of the provision, which their own industry produces ; looking quietly on, while they see the fruits of all their labour spent or spoiled ; and if one of the number take or touch a particle of the hoard, the others joining against him, and hanging him for the theft.
Page 673 - Offenders so convicted to be detained and kept in safe Custody until Return can be conveniently made to such Warrant of Distress...
Page 239 - Commentaries remarks that this law of nature, being coeval with mankind and dictated by God himself, is, of course, superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid derive all their force, and all their validity, and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Page 37 - ... a convenient stock of flax hemp wool thread iron and other necessary ware and stuff to set the poor on work: and also competent sums of money for and towards the necessary relief of the lame impotent old blind and such other among them being poor and not able to work...
Page 247 - These seem to be the events, which are not very remote, and which reason foresees as clearly almost as she can do any thing that lies in the womb of time. And though the ancients maintained, that, in order to reach the gift of prophecy, a certain divine fury or madness was requisite, one may safely affirm, that, in order to deliver such prophecies as these, no more is necessary than merely to be in one's senses, free from the influence of popular madness and delusion.

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