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CONTENTS OF VOLUME THE THIRD

CLASSICAL MUSEUM.

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XI. Professor Voemel's Defence of the Genuineness of the
Documents in Demosthenes's Speech on the Crown,
against Professor Droysen. By F. W. Newman
XII. Ptolemy's Knowledge of Arabia. By Dr. W. Plate
XIII. The Antigone of Sophocles and the Foreign Quarterly
Review. By Th. Dyer
XIV. The Asylum of Romulus. By Dr. Ihne
XV. Beckeri Topographia Urbis Romae. By Professor L.
Urlichs

XVI. Miscellanies

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XVII. Literary Intelligence...

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XVIII. Notices of Recent Publications

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XXVI. On Victorinus; a Contribution to the History of
Roman Literature. By Dr. L. Lersch
XXVII. On the Latin Word Immo or Imo. By Professor

Long

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XXX. Notices of Recent Publications

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3. Recherches sur les langues Celtiques. Par W. F. Ed-

wards. Paris, 1845.

4. Introduction to a Grammar of the Language of Bur-
mah. By Th. Latter. Calcutta, 1845.

XXXVII. Notices of Recent Publications

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443

THE

CLASSICAL MUSEUM.

I.

ON THE USE OF THE TERMS ACANTHUS, ACANTHION, &c., IN THE ANCIENT CLASSICS.

GREAT confusion exists among the writers of antiquity in the use of the allied terms, ̓́Ακανθος, ̓́Ακανθα, ̓Ακάνθιον, Lat. Acanthus, Acanthium; and this confusion is multiplied tenfold by the critics and commentators, who have endeavoured to illustrate these terms by identifying them in the several instances where they occur, with plants known to the modern botanist. Nevertheless, I venture to pursue their steps, because some of the passages to be elucidated occur in the most favourite authors, and are, on other accounts, highly interesting and beautiful.

These names, agreeably to their etymology (AC, a point, and ANTH, flower), appear to have been given almost indiscriminately to any spinous flower, to any flowering plant which bore thorns or prickles. These may be conveniently reduced to five classes, each including plants which, though now accurately distinguished in botanical systems, have so many common properties that in ancient times they would all be comprised under the same denomination. I shall produce them according to their order in the Linnæan arrangement.

I.

THE GENUS ACANTHUS.-Linn. (Didynamia Angiospermia. Nat. Order, Personatæ.)

This is the plant known in pharmacy and in the gardens under the name Brank-ursine. It appears to be accurately

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