Einstein's Monsters: The Life and Times of Black Holes

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W. W. Norton & Company, Nov 13, 2018 - Science - 304 pages

“[A] skillfully told history of the quest to find black holes.” —Manjit Kumar, Financial Times

Black holes are the best-known and least-understood objects in the universe. In Einstein’s Monsters, distinguished astronomer Chris Impey takes readers on a vivid tour of these enigmatic giants. He weaves a fascinating tale out of the fiendishly complex math of black holes and the colorful history of their discovery. Impey blends this history with a poignant account of the phenomena scientists have witnessed while observing black holes: stars swarming like bees around the center of our galaxy; black holes performing gravitational waltzes with visible stars; the cymbal clash of two black holes colliding, releasing ripples in space time. Clear, compelling, and profound, Einstein’s Monsters reveals how our comprehension of black holes is intrinsically linked to how we make sense of the universe and our place within it.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fpagan - LibraryThing

An astronomer's account of the past and current state of the astronomy of black holes, both stellar-mass and supermassive. The story of how gravitational-wave detectors have been added to the panoply ... Read full review

Einstein's Monsters: The Life and Times of Black Holes

User Review  - Publishers Weekly

Science writer and astrophysicist Impey (Beyond: Our Future in Space) gives an absorbing and lay-reader-friendly look at the intriguing dead stars called black holes. Impey begins in 1784 with the ... Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Black Holes from Star Death
Supermassive Black Holes
Gravitational Engines
PART B BLACK HOLES PAST PRESENT AND FUTURE
Black Holes as Tests of Gravity
Seeing with Gravity Eyes
The Fate of Black Holes
NOTES
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Chris Impey is a distinguished professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Arizona and the critically-acclaimed author of Beyond, How It Began, and How It Ends, and four other books, as well as two astronomy textbooks. He lives in Tucson, Arizona.

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