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LARGE PAPER COPY.
45 ARIOSTO. ORLANDO FURIOSO.

In English Heroical Verse by St John Harington, of Bathe,
Knight, now thirdly revised & amended, with the addition of
the Author's Epigrams.

Engraved title, with medallion portraits, and full-page
engravings in the text.

LARGE PAPER Copy. Folio. Calf.
London, Printed by G. Miller. 1634.

£15 159
The translator, Sir John Harington, was godson of Queen Elizabeth. He
studied law at Lincoln's Inn, but not to much purpose, for his reputation as a wit
and a man of the world was soon established, and he looked to court favour rather
than the exercise of a profession. About 1584 he married Mary, daughter of Sir
George Rogers of Cannington in Somerset, but marriage does not seem to have
sobered his exuberant spirits .His epigrams began to pass current, and he enlivened
the court by his sallies, which were not always adapted to a fastidious taste.
Among other things, he translated for the amusement of the ladies of the court the
story of Giocondo, from the twenty-eighth book of Ariosto's “Orlando Furioso,"
and his translation was handed about in manuscript till it fell into the hands of the
queen. She reprimanded Harington for corrupting the morals of her ladies by
translating the least seemly part of Ariosto's work, and ordered him as a punish-
ment to leave the court for his country house till he had made a translation of the
whole. To this we owe the translation of the “ Orlando Furioso," which was first
published in folio in 1591, and reissued in 1607 and 16:34. It is written in the same
stanza as the original, and is easy and flowing. It is rather a paraphrase than a
translation. As a preface to it Harington wrote “ An Apologie of Poetrie," an
essay in criticism which resembles Sir Philip Sidney's treatise of the same name.
The most remarkable part of it is that concerned with his

use of metre, especially
his defence of two-syllabled and three-syllabled rhymes. (D.N.B.).

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SEVEN PLANETS GOVERNING Italie, or His Satyrs in
seven Famous discourses, shewing the estate 1. Of the Court and
Courtiers. 2. Of Libertie and the Clergy in general. 3. Of the
Romane Clergie. 4. Of Marriage. 5. Of Soldiers, Musitians,
and Lovers. 6. Of Schoolemasters and Schollers.
Honour, and the happiest life. In verse.

Newly Corrected and Augmented, with many excellent and
noteworthy Notes, together with a new Addition of three most

7. Of
ARIOSTO: SEVEN PLANETS GOVERNING ITALIE— continued.

excellent Elegies, written by the same Lodovico Ariosto, the
effect whereof is contained in the Argument.

Small 4to. Red morocco, g.e.

London, Printed by William Stansby for Roger Jackson,
1611.

£25
Erroneously ascribed by the publisher to Gervase Markham, but in reality the
work of Robert Tofte, poet and translator.

FROM THE LIBRARY OF WILLIAM CECIL, LORD BURLEIGH.
47 ARISTOTLE. OPUSCULA. (In Greek.)

4to. Frankfort, 1584.

FROM THE LIBRARY OF THE CELEBRATED William CECIL,
LORD BURLEIGH.

Bound in contemporary calf, with Lord Burleigh's Arms
stamped in blind in centre of each cover.

£15 159
William Cecil, Lord Burleigh (1520-1598), was the guardian of Shakespeare's
friend and patron, the Earl of Southampton.

48

POLITIQUES, or DISCOURSES OF GOVERNMENT. Trans-
lated out of Greeke into French, with Expositions taken out of
the best Authours, specially out of Aristotle himselfe, and out of
Plato, etc. By Loys le Roys, called Regius.

Translated out of French into English (by I. D.).
First EDITION IN ENGLISH.
Folio. Contemporary vellum binding.
London, Printed by Adam Islip, 1598.

£10 IOS
A VERY INTERESTING COPY—At the beginning and end have been bound
in a number of blank leaves, which have been partly used for comments and refer-
ences to the text. There are besides many marginal notes in ink throughout the
volume by the same hand.

ARISTOTLE is a work which Shakespeare is known to have consulted, as he
makes reference to the classic in “ Troilus and Cressida " where he wrote of " young
men whom Aristotle thought unfit to hear moral philosophy.”

ARISTOTLE—continued. 49

POLITIQUES, or Discourses of Government. Translated out of Greek into French. Translated out of French into English (by I. D.).

FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH.

London, Printed by Adam Islip, 1598.
GRIMALDUS (Laurentius). THE COUNSELLOR. Exactly pour-
traited in two Bookes. Wherein the offices of Magistrates, the
happie life of Subiectes, and the felicitie of Common-weales is
pleasantly and pithilie discoursed.

FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH.
London, Imprinted by Richard Bradocke, 1598.
The two works bound together.
Folio. Old calf.
(SEE ILLUSTRATION, Plate No. IV.)

£65
“ The Counsellor is a very important work, as it is supposed to have influenced
Shakespeare when re-writing portions of the second 4to of “Hamlet.”
passages seem to have been incorporated in the play.

Th last copy which we can trace as being sold by auction realized 850 dollars

Whole

in 1921.

50 ARMIN (Robert). THE VALIANT. WELSHMAN, or the True

Chronicle History of the Life and Valiant Deeds of Caradoc the Great King of Cambria now called Wales. As it hath been sundry times acted by the Prince of Wales his Servants.

Woodcut frontispiece. Small 4to. Bound by Riviere in full polished calf gilt, g. e. London, 1663.

£31 ios The Frontispiece appears for the First time in this the Second Edition.

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THE FIRST APPEARANCE IN PRINT OF “THE NUT-BROWN MAID." 51 ARNOLD (Richard). [CHRONICLE.] In this Booke is con

teyned the Names of ye Baylifs, Custos, Mairs, and Sherefs of the Cite of Londo, from the Tyme of Kinge Richard the Furst; and also th’ Artycles of the Chartur and Libarties of the same Cyte; and of the Chartur and Liberties off England, wyth odur dyvers mats good and necessary for

every

Citeze to understond and knowe.

BLACK LETTER. Double columns. FIRST EDITION.
Small folio. Old red morocco gilt, g. e.
[ Antwerp. John Doesborowe, 1503.]

£25 Wants the three preliminary leaves and A8 and Bl.

This interesting and rare work has been called “The Customes of London”. the other, and more common title, “ Arnold's Chronicle,” was first bestowed on it by Thomas Heare, and afterwards generally adopted. It is an extraordinary medley of information, consisting of a list of the Mayors and other officers; of charters, municipal regulations, assizes of bread, legal and mercantile forms of documents, family and other receipts, with some historical matters; the whole being adapted to the particular and more immediate use of the citizens of London. Its most interesting feature is its introduction of the “ Ballade of ye Nottebrowne Mayde,'' which occurs, without explanation, between an account of the tolls payable by English merchants sending merchandise to Antwerp, and a statement of the differences between English and Flemish currencies. No earlier version of the ballad is known, and according to Capel, Warton, Douce, and Collier, it is probable that it had been composed only a few years before Arnold transcribed and printed it. Its authorship is unknown; but Douce assumes, on very just grounds, that it was translated from an old German ballad by some Englishmen whom Arnold met at Antwerp.

With the “ sancti albani” stamp on last page.

51A

THE NUT-BROWN Mad."
[CHRONICLE.] In this boke is conteined

ye

names of the baylyfs, Custose, Mayers and Sherefs of ye Cyte of london from the tyme of kynge Richard the fyrst and also the artycles of

ye Chartour and lybartyes of the same Cyte. And of the chartour and lybartyes of England with other dyvers maters good

for

every cytezen to understand and knowe.

and necessary

(Continued over)

ARNOLD (Richard): [CHRONICLE]—continued.

BLACK LETTER. Double columns. Small folio. Full brown morocco, tooled in blind and gilt, g. e. by Ramage. [Southwark, P. Treveris, 1521.]

£36 This, the second edition of “ Arnold's Chronicle," continues the list of Sheriffs, etc., down to 12 Henry VIII. (1521), while the first edition only goes as far as 18 Henry VII. Apparently it is executed with English types and there is little doubt that it came from the press of Peter Treveris, the first printer to set up a press in Southwark. It also includes the ballad of “ The Nut-brown Maid,” altered materially from that appearing in the first edition of 1503.

The last leaf facsimiled from the first edition.

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Latin tong.

52 ASCHAM (Roger). THE SCHOLEMASTER; or plaine and perfite way of teaching children, to understand, write, and speake, the

London, Printed by John Daye, 1571.

A REPORT AND Discourse, written by Roger Ascham, of the affaires and state of Germany and the Emperour Charles, his court, duryng certaine yeares while the sayd Roger was there.

BLACK LETTER.
London, Printed by John Daye, N.D.
Small 4to. The two works bound together, original calf.

£9 9s

53

Toxophilus, The Schoole, or partitions of Shooting contayned in two bookes, Written by Roger Ascham And now newly perused. Pleasaunt for all Gentlemen and Yomen of England for their pastime to reade, and profitable for their use to follow both in Warre and

peace.
BLACK LETTER. Woodcut border to title.

.
Small 4to. Newly bound in full calf gilt, g.e.
At London, Printed by Abell Jeffes, 1589.

Cited by Douce in his “ Illustrations” of King Lear, and by Wright in his editions of As You Like It” and “King Lear." Consult, too, Drake's " Shakespeare and his Times," Vol. II., p. 181. A portion is reprinted in Capell's “ School of Shakespeare.” Capell's “Catalogue of Shakespeariana,” No. 15.

£18 18

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