The Antiquary, Volume 37

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Edward Walford, John Charles Cox, George Latimer Apperson
Elliot Stock, 1901 - Archaeology
 

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Page 139 - I do not love thee, Dr. Fell, The reason why I cannot tell; But this I know, and know full well, I do not love thee. Dr. Fell.
Page 105 - In him was life; and the life was the light of men. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.
Page 265 - For he would never thus have flown, And left me twice so doubly lone, — Lone as the corse within its shroud, Lone as a solitary cloud, A single cloud on a...
Page 367 - Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! And may there be no sadness of farewell, When I embark; For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crossed the bar.
Page 365 - A land of old upheaven from the abyss By fire, to sink into the abyss again ; Where fragments of forgotten peoples dwelt, And the long mountains ended in a coast Of ever-shifting sand, and far away The phantom circle of a moaning sea. There the pursuer could pursue no more, And he that fled no further fly the King...
Page 102 - And he brought me into the inner court of the Lord's house, and, behold, at the door of the temple of the Lord, between the porch and the altar, were about five and twenty men, with their backs toward the temple of the Lord, and their faces toward the east; and they worshipped the sun toward the east.
Page 339 - THERE is a land of pure delight, Where saints immortal reign ; Infinite day excludes the night, And pleasures banish, pain. 2 There everlasting spring abides, And never-withering flowers : Death, like a narrow sea, divides This heavenly land from ours.
Page 82 - But the Nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles are not ceased. He that at midnight, when the very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, the clear airs, the sweet descants, the natural rising and falling, the doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say...
Page 198 - No, Sir ; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Page 180 - That it may please Thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly fruits of the earth, so as in due time we may enjoy them : We beseech Thee to hear us good Lord.

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