Travels in Kashmir, Ladak, Iskardo, the Countries Adjoining the Mountain-course of the Indus, and the Himalaya, North of the Panjab, Volume 2

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Page 140 - Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, and that they may be as frontlets between your eyes.
Page 130 - ... about five minutes, and then taken into the canal, by a man standing in the water ; one end is gathered up in his hand, and the shawl swung round and beaten with great force upon a flat stone, being dipped into the canal between every three or four strokes. This occupies about five minutes. They are then dried in the shade, as the hot sun spoils the colours ; and in ten days afterwards the coloured shawls undergo a similar process, but occupying less time. The white ones, after being submitted...
Page 133 - ... can require. His host, of course, takes care to repay himself in the end. He has an understanding with the shawl manufacturers who frequent his house, so that the guest is at the mercy of both parties : and should he quarrel with the broker, and hope to make a purchase without his intervention, he would find it impossible. No...
Page 428 - War in each breast, and freedom on each brow — How much unlike the sons of Britain now ! Fired at the sound, my genius spreads her wing, And flies where Britain courts the western spring ; Where lawns extend that scorn Arcadian pride, And brighter streams than famed Hydaspes glide...
Page 215 - Forth rush'd the swain with hospitable haste. Straight to the lodgments of his herd he run, Where the fat porkers slept beneath the sun ; Of two, his cutlass launch'd the spouting blood; These quarter'd...
Page 129 - ... floodgates at the Drogjun. Some ruins, in large limestone blocks, are lying on the washing-place, and in one of these is a round hole about a foot and a half in diameter, 'and a foot in depth. In this the shawl is placed, and water being poured over it, it is stamped on by naked feet for about five minutes, and then taken into the canal by a man standing in the water ; one end is gathered up in his hand, and the shawl swung round and beaten with great force upon a flat stone, being dipped into...
Page 132 - ... who, it may be, is awaiting the traveller with a friendly hug at the bottom of the pass, two or three days' journey from the city, to which he obsequiously conducts him. He finds himself at home at the house of his new friend, and himself and servants studiously provided with all he can require.
Page 132 - By their means they seldom fail to hear of any saudagur or merchant who is about to start for Kashmir, even from such a distance as Calcutta, and, if he be a rich man, the mokym will send as far as Delhi to meet him, and invite him to become his guest, during his sojourn in the valley. Perhaps, again, when the merchant, half dead with fatigue and cold, stands at length on the snowy summit of the Pir Panjal, or either of the other mountain passes, he is suddenly amazed by finding there a servant of...
Page 131 - ... saturated with the liquor, and then stamped upon, washed with the hand, and then well steeped in the canal. In the plains, the berries of the raynti fruit, stirred up with water, yet not so as to form a lather, are used for washing a soiled shawl. A smaller root, known also by the name of kritz, is used for cotton clothes. The colours of a shawl, after it has been washed, are often renewed so well as to deceive any but the initiated, by pricking them in again with a wooden pin, dipped in the...
Page 66 - East with a rapidity unequalled, excepting in the regions of the telegraph and the steam-engine : it would be looked upon as the accomplishment of the one thing needful for the consolidation of the British power in Northern India ; and the respect for the name, and a wish for the friendship and alliance, of England, would increase in proportion to the belief in the fruitlessness of any subsequent attempt at dispossession.

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