The Wind in the Willows

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1908 - Animals - 302 pages
The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside--Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger.
 

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User Review  - 2wonderY - www.librarything.com

This is such an engaging rendition, with the text and illustrations harmonizing happily, I decided to own it. I understand that Philpot has more illustrations for the extended story, and I want them too. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - 2wonderY - LibraryThing

Not worth the cheap paper it's printed on. Pedestrian adaptation and muddy black and white illustrations are very derivative. Shame. Read full review

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Contents

I
1
II
24
III
46
IV
69
V
93
VI
120
VII
144
VIII
163
IX
187
X
217
XI
247
XII
278
Copyright

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Page 7 - Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.
Page 100 - I'm not sure of the way! And I want your nose, Mole, so come on quick, there's a good fellow!' And the Rat pressed forward on his way without waiting for an answer. Poor Mole stood alone in the road, his heart torn asunder, and a big sob gathering, gathering, somewhere low down inside him, to leap up to the surface presently, he knew, in passionate escape. But even under such a test as this his loyalty to his friend stood firm. Never for a moment did he dream of abandoning him. Meanwhile, the wafts...
Page 113 - Goodman Joseph toiled through the snow— Saw the star o'er a stable low; Mary she might not further go— Welcome thatch, and litter below! Joy was hers in the morning! And then they heard the angels tell 'Who were the first to cry Nowell? Animals all, as it befell, In the stable where they did dwell! Joy shall be theirs in the morning!
Page 35 - I think about it,' he added pathetically, in a lower tone: 'I think about it — all the time!' The Mole reached out from under his blanket, felt for the Rat's paw in the darkness, and gave it a squeeze. T11 do whatever you like, Ratty,
Page 209 - Back into speech again it passed, and with beating heart he was following the adventures of a dozen seaports, the fights, the escapes, the rallies, the comradeships, the gallant undertakings; or he searched islands for treasure, fished in still lagoons and dozed daylong on warm white sand. Of deep-sea fishings he heard tell, and mighty silver gatherings of the mile-long net; of sudden perils, noise of breakers on a moonless night, or the tall bows of the great liner taking shape overhead through...
Page 167 - When the girl returned, some hours later, she carried a tray, with a cup of fragrant tea steaming on it; and a plate piled up with very hot buttered toast, cut thick, very brown on both sides, with the butter running through the holes in it in great golden drops, like honey from the honeycomb. The smell of that buttered toast simply talked to Toad, and with no uncertain voice; talked of warm kitchens, of breakfasts on bright frosty mornings, of cosy parlour firesides on winter evenings, when one's...
Page 12 - Beyond the Wild Wood comes the Wide World,' [said the Rat]. 'And that's something that doesn't matter, either to you or me. I've never been there, and I'm never going, nor you either, if you've got any sense at all. Don't ever refer to it again...
Page 127 - I have his solemn promise to that effect." "That is very good news," said the Mole gravely. "Very good news indeed," observed the Rat dubiously, "if only — if only — " He was looking very hard at Toad as he said this, and could not help thinking he perceived something vaguely resembling a twinkle in that animal's still sorrowful eye. "There's only one thing more to be done," continued the gratified Badger. "Toad, I want you solemnly to repeat, before your friends here, what you fully admitted...
Page 149 - The water's own noises, too, were more apparent than by day, its gurglings and "cloops" more unexpected and near at hand; and constantly they started at what seemed a sudden clear call from an actual articulate voice. The line of the horizon was clear and hard against the sky, and in one particular quarter it showed black against a silvery climbing phosphorescence that grew and grew. At last, over the rim of the waiting earth the moon lifted with slow majesty till it swung clear of the horizon and...
Page 41 - O what a flowery track lies spread before me, henceforth! What dust-clouds shall spring up behind me as I speed on my reckless way! What carts I shall fling carelessly into the ditch in the wake of my magnificent onset!

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