The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New monthly magazine and literary journal (and humorist) [afterw.] The New monthly (magazine).

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Page 24 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me About my moneys and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug, For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own. Well, then, it now appears you need my help. Go to, then ; you come to me, and you say, Shylock, we would have moneys...
Page 216 - I'll not leave thee, thou lone one! To pine on the stem; Since the lovely are sleeping, Go, sleep thou with them; Thus kindly I scatter Thy leaves o'er the bed Where thy mates of the garden Lie scentless and dead.
Page 56 - Augustan era ; and, on grounds of plain sense and universal logic, to see and assert the superiority of the former in the truth and nativeness both of their thoughts and diction.
Page 63 - And all the shows o' the world are frail and vain To weep a loss that turns their lights to shade. It is a woe too deep for tears, when all Is reft at once, when some surpassing Spirit, Whose light adorned the world around it, leaves Those who remain behind...
Page 16 - Smiling so tranquilly, and set, so deep ! Oft doth your dreamy loveliness return, Colouring the tender shadows of my sleep With light Elysian ; for the hues that steep Your shores in melting lustre, seem to float On golden clouds from spirit-lands remote, Isles of the blest; and in our memory keep Their place with holiest harmonies : fair scene, Most loved by evening and her dewy star!
Page 56 - In our own English compositions (at least for the last three years of our school education) he showed no mercy to phrase, metaphor, or image, unsupported by a sound sense, or where the same sense might have been conveyed with equal force and dignity in plainer words.
Page 127 - WE, THE POOR LAW COMMISSIONERS, in pursuance of the authorities vested in Us by an Act passed in the fifth year of the reign of His late Majesty King William the Fourth, intituled "An Act for the Amendment and better Administration of the Laws relating to the Poor in England and Wales...
Page 126 - That an humble address be presented to His Majesty, praying that he would be graciously pleased to give directions that there be laid before the House...
Page 58 - own exceeding great reward"; it has soothed my afflictions; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments; it has endeared solitude; and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and the beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.
Page 163 - Countries wear very different appearances to travellers of different circumstances. A man who is whirled through Europe in a post-chaise, and the pilgrim who walks the grand tour on foot, will form very different conclusions.

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