A Classical Dictionary of India: Illustrative of the Mythology, Philosophy, Literature, Antiquities, Arts, Manners, Customs &c. of the Hindus

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Higginbotham and Company, 1871 - Hindus - 793 pages
 

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Contents

I
iii
II
1
III
71
IV
120
V
142
VI
202
VII
211
VIII
217
XIII
357
XIV
364
XV
408
XVI
430
XVII
432
XVIII
495
XIX
522
XX
632

IX
239
X
259
XI
270
XII
295
XXI
648
XXII
667
XXIII
742

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Page 752 - They sin who tell us Love can die. With life all other passions fly, All others are but vanity. In Heaven Ambition cannot dwell, Nor Avarice in the vaults of Hell ; Earthly these passions of the Earth, They perish where they have their birth ; But Love is indestructible. Its holy flame for ever burneth, From Heaven it came, to Heaven returneth...
Page 758 - Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho...
Page 625 - No other effectual duty is known for virtuous women, at any time after the death of their lords, except casting themselves into the same fire. As long as a woman (in her successive transmigrations) shall decline burning herself, like a faithful wife, on the same fire with her deceased lord, so long Shall she be not exempted from springing again to life in the body of some female aaiSutler.
Page 592 - Arian people, whose whole religion was a worship of the wonderful powers and phenomena of nature, had no sooner perceived that this liquid had power to elevate the spirits, and produce a temporary frenzy, under the influence of which the individual was prompted to, and capable of, deeds beyond his natural powers, than they found in it something divine : it was, to their apprehension, a god, endowing those into whom it entered, with godlike powers ; the plant which afforded it became to them the king...
Page 113 - ... when he saw a dead body on the road, lying on a bier and covered with a cloth. The friends stood about crying, sobbing, tearing their hair, covering their heads with dust, striking their breasts, and uttering wild cries. The prince, again, calling his coachman to witness this painful scene, exclaimed...
Page 61 - The most prominent characteristic feature of the Atharva is the multitnde of incantations which it contains ; these are pronounced either by the person who is himself to be benefited, or, more often, by the sorcerer for him, and are directed to the procuring of the greatest variety of desirable ends...
Page 50 - There was a time when the ancestors of the Celts, the Germans, the Slavonians, the Greeks, and Italians, the Persians, and Hindus, were living together beneath the same roof, separate from the ancestors of the Semitic and Turanian races.
Page 154 - Danda, or wand, with several processes or projections from it, and a piece of cloth dyed with red ochre, in which the Brahmanical cord is supposed to be enshrined, attached to it : he shaves his hair and beard, wears only a cloth round his loins, and subsists upon food obtained...
Page 672 - Gopwhaiidana, from the root of the hair to the commencement of each eyebrow, and a transverse streak connecting them across the root of the nose ; in the centre is a perpendicular streak of red, made with red sanders, or...
Page 752 - A sudden thrill, a startling thought, A feeling many a year forgot, Now like a dream anew recurring, As if again in every vein Her mother's milk was stirring.

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