Fisher's Drawing Room Scrap Book

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Fisher, Son, and Jackson, 1835 - English poetry
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Page 18 - What a fool, quoth he, am I, thus to lie in a stinking dungeon, when I may as well walk at liberty ! I have a key in my bosom, called Promise, that will, I am persuaded, open any • lock in Doubting Castle.
Page 18 - ... castle-yard, and with his key opened that door also. After he went to the iron gate, for that must be opened too, but that lock went very hard, yet the key did open it. Then they thrust open the gate to make their escape with speed ; but that gate as it opened made such a creaking, that it waked Giant Despair, who, hastily rising to pursue his prisoners, felt his limbs to fail, for his fits took him again, so that he could by no means go after them.
Page 86 - Hark, said Mr. Great-Heart, to what the shepherd's boy saith ! so they hearkened, and he said, He that is down needs fear no fall ; He that is low no pride; He that is humble ever shall Have God to be his Guide.
Page 18 - Then they thrust open the gate to make their escape with speed; but that gate as it opened made such a creaking, that it waked Giant Despair, who hastily rising to pursue his prisoners, felt his limbs to fail, for his fits took him again, so that he could by no means go after them. Then they went on, and came to the King's Highway again, and so were safe, because they were out of his jurisdiction.
Page 18 - Then Christian pulled it out of his bosom, and began to try at the dungeon-door, whose bolt, as he turned the key, gave back, and the door flew open with ease, and Christian and Hopeful both came out. Then he went to the outward door that leads into the castle-yard, and with his key opened that door also. After...
Page 4 - To hold the gold basin, It grieves me full sore ; Oh kill me, dear Lonkin, And let my mother go.
Page 86 - I am content with what I have, Little be it or much ; And, Lord ! contentment still I crave, Because thou savest such. Fulness to such a burden is, That go on pilgrimage: Here little, and hereafter bliss, Is best from age to age.

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