A help to knowledge, chiefly religious, in extracts from the most approved writers, arranged by T. Chamberlain

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James Burns, 1839
 

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Page 79 - What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good ? Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile. Depart from evil, and do good, seek peace, and pursue it.
Page 80 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 50 - He said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground; and should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how.
Page 84 - But every man, when he enters into society, gives up a part of his natural liberty, as the price of so valuable a purchase ; and in consideration of receiving the advantages of mutual commerce, obliges himself to conform to those laws, which the community has thought proper to establish.
Page 88 - He that goeth about to persuade a multitude that they are not so well governed as they ought to be, shall never want attentive and favourable hearers...
Page 81 - ... and duty, to be formed to the greatest degree of vigilance, foresight, and circumspection, in a state of things in which no fault is committed with impunity, and the slightest mistakes draw on the most ruinous consequences - to be led to a guarded and regulated conduct, from a sense that you are...
Page 93 - As for nobility in particular persons, it is a reverend thing to see an ancient castle or building not in decay, or to see a fair timber tree sound and perfect; how much more to behold an ancient noble family, which hath stood against the waves and weathers of time?
Page 47 - Brethren, be followers together of me, and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an ensample. (For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ, whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things...
Page 94 - He is called parson, persona, because by his person the church, which is an invisible body, is represented ; and he is in himself a body corporate, in order to protect and defend the rights of the church, which he personates, by a perpetual succession (л).
Page 39 - Though private prayer be a brave design, Yet public hath more promises, more love : And love's a weight to hearts, to eyes a sign. We all are but cold suitors ; let us move Where it is warmest. Leave thy six and seven ; Pray with the most : for where most pray, is heaven.

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